T200/Duetz timing belt

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WebbCo

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There are specail tools needed to do this job. Hope one of the techs on this forum will chime in and fill us all in better. At my dealership we get a lot of basket cases in when someone starts this job and we have to finish it. Seems like there are pins to line up everything. You could call us if no one chimes in. Let me know.
 

siduramaxde

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There are specail tools needed to do this job. Hope one of the techs on this forum will chime in and fill us all in better. At my dealership we get a lot of basket cases in when someone starts this job and we have to finish it. Seems like there are pins to line up everything. You could call us if no one chimes in. Let me know.
Well, I thought I could make it to winter to change the timming belt out on my machine and at 1795 hrs. the belt let loose today. Guys, this is not a fun thing and it is not cheap to repair after the belt is broke. Seems that when the belt breaks, push rods get bent? Don't put the timing belt replacement off!!! My dealer quoted me $1000+ to fix. I would imagine most of you guys would have to have this fixed in the field because once the belt breaks the machine won't move (brakes remain locked) and to move the loader takes everything a T250 has. I'm lucky that my friend was able to push my T200 on my trailer. I'll be going to the stealer in the morning to drop it off for the repair. It has not been a profitable or fun day.
Rod
 

owensge

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Oct 17, 2003
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Well, I thought I could make it to winter to change the timming belt out on my machine and at 1795 hrs. the belt let loose today. Guys, this is not a fun thing and it is not cheap to repair after the belt is broke. Seems that when the belt breaks, push rods get bent? Don't put the timing belt replacement off!!! My dealer quoted me $1000+ to fix. I would imagine most of you guys would have to have this fixed in the field because once the belt breaks the machine won't move (brakes remain locked) and to move the loader takes everything a T250 has. I'm lucky that my friend was able to push my T200 on my trailer. I'll be going to the stealer in the morning to drop it off for the repair. It has not been a profitable or fun day.
Rod
Rod, thanks for the heads up. My T200 just went over 1000 hours and you've got me thinking about mine.
 

Tazza

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Rod, thanks for the heads up. My T200 just went over 1000 hours and you've got me thinking about mine.
I would be more worried about bent valves, push rods are simple to replace, valves require the head to come off.
I hope you didn't do too much damage. Thats the problem with diesels, the valves are an interference setup. If the belt snaps or slips the valves will strike the top of the piston(s) because they are out of time with the rest of the engine. Hopefully there isn't serious damage to the tops of the pistons too.
Let us know how you go.
 

CUT_TLB

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Oct 31, 2007
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I would be more worried about bent valves, push rods are simple to replace, valves require the head to come off.
I hope you didn't do too much damage. Thats the problem with diesels, the valves are an interference setup. If the belt snaps or slips the valves will strike the top of the piston(s) because they are out of time with the rest of the engine. Hopefully there isn't serious damage to the tops of the pistons too.
Let us know how you go.
I thought most of these smaller Diesels had gear-driven cams. At least the Kubotas, Yanmars, and Daedongs I have had apart have no belts (and therefore require no timing maintenance). Deutz uses belts, hunh? Any others with belts or chains?
 

Tazza

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I thought most of these smaller Diesels had gear-driven cams. At least the Kubotas, Yanmars, and Daedongs I have had apart have no belts (and therefore require no timing maintenance). Deutz uses belts, hunh? Any others with belts or chains?
Pugeot engines run chains, thats why after time they start making rattling noises and when its bad enough it can actually jump gears and cause all sorts of troubles.
 

siduramaxde

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Pugeot engines run chains, thats why after time they start making rattling noises and when its bad enough it can actually jump gears and cause all sorts of troubles.
Just to let you all know, I got my machine back running. I guess Duetz designed these engines with the thought that the timing belt could break because they only thing they mention to check in the manual is the push rods. In my case all the push rods were bent and looked like a “S”. My belt didn't actually break but some of the teeth were missing.
When the belt breaks the machine will not move so I strongly suggest if you have the duetz motor to keep tabs on the timming belt.
 

Tazza

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Just to let you all know, I got my machine back running. I guess Duetz designed these engines with the thought that the timing belt could break because they only thing they mention to check in the manual is the push rods. In my case all the push rods were bent and looked like a “S”. My belt didn't actually break but some of the teeth were missing.
When the belt breaks the machine will not move so I strongly suggest if you have the duetz motor to keep tabs on the timming belt.
Thats a good idea actually, the rods bend before there is any damage to the valves.
Glad you got the machine going again!
 

pelpel

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Thats a good idea actually, the rods bend before there is any damage to the valves.
Glad you got the machine going again!
Hmm, in order for the pushrods to bend, they have to come to a sudden stop. This would happen when the valves hit a hard object (piston). I can't see the pushrods bending without any damage to valves. Either the engine is self-destructive or not. At the very least I would supect bent valves, or worse piston damage. I am not trying to make this sound worse that it appears to be, just that the only way for a pushrod to bend is to have a valve hit a piston........ cheers.....
 

WebbCo

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Hmm, in order for the pushrods to bend, they have to come to a sudden stop. This would happen when the valves hit a hard object (piston). I can't see the pushrods bending without any damage to valves. Either the engine is self-destructive or not. At the very least I would supect bent valves, or worse piston damage. I am not trying to make this sound worse that it appears to be, just that the only way for a pushrod to bend is to have a valve hit a piston........ cheers.....
The push rods are meant to bend and save the engine when timing is off, we have replaced several of these by re installing a belt and then new pushrods, most of the time its good to go.
Rarely is there more needed but it can damage the top of the pistons when they collide.
Mark
 

pelpel

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The push rods are meant to bend and save the engine when timing is off, we have replaced several of these by re installing a belt and then new pushrods, most of the time its good to go.
Rarely is there more needed but it can damage the top of the pistons when they collide.
Mark
So the design has the pushrods being the sacrificial lamb, I like that. I was just suprised that an engine can survive a valve / piston impact and still run after pushrod repalcement. I guess my fore-fathers were thinking when they designed this. Thanks for the info. Peter
 

Tazza

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So the design has the pushrods being the sacrificial lamb, I like that. I was just suprised that an engine can survive a valve / piston impact and still run after pushrod repalcement. I guess my fore-fathers were thinking when they designed this. Thanks for the info. Peter
I too thought about this and figured it would probably kill valves but then i thought about it more. Diesels usually have the pistons in-line with the valves, so if it was to hit from a broken belt it would hit square on the end of the valve and it wouldn't bend but the push rod will as its much weaker. I was thinking like what cars have, most valves are at like 25 degrees and if a valve is down and strikes the piston you will damage the piston and bend valves.
Its a pretty good idea but i really don't like timing belts on diesels! I like my gears on my Kubota, never a problem!
 
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