A helpful hint on chaincases

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A+ Skidloader

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Joined
Jan 17, 2008
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6
A thread about draining the chaincase reminded me of this: On my first Bobcat (12 machines ago) I didn't change the chaincase oil very often because it was such a pain to do--suck it out somehow, wipe up what wont come out. The oil ended up milky from water contamination, so I had to change it. I drilled a small hole right at the bottom of the chaincase in the front, which of course allowed the oil to drain (jack up the rear and only a few ounces at most don't drain out). I then tapped out the hole for a pipe plug. I have done this to every machine since, and always change the oil annually now--easy to do and I think good insurance. Since all the oil does is lube the chains and brgs, I just keep my eyes open for a deal on cheap offbread motor oil and usually find it pretty cheap when someone has a big sale. CHEAP INSURANCE, and no crud/milk/sludge if changed annually.
 

skidsteer.ca

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Jan 20, 2006
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Actually there is a drain plug at the rear of the chain case on most model in the last 15 years. (ones with the moror in sideways)
It is at the rear or the chaincase. Look undeneath the machine at the rear. There is a steel plate held on by 3 3/8” bolts (9/16” wrench)
Inside there is a plug facing forward to drain the chaincase and one facing rear to drain the fuel tank.
The plugs are rubber with a steel pin pushed in the center to exspand them tight. Pull the pin out with a vise grip and then the rubber plug
Ken
 

Fishfiles

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Joined
Feb 8, 2007
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1,698
Actually there is a drain plug at the rear of the chain case on most model in the last 15 years. (ones with the moror in sideways)
It is at the rear or the chaincase. Look undeneath the machine at the rear. There is a steel plate held on by 3 3/8” bolts (9/16” wrench)
Inside there is a plug facing forward to drain the chaincase and one facing rear to drain the fuel tank.
The plugs are rubber with a steel pin pushed in the center to exspand them tight. Pull the pin out with a vise grip and then the rubber plug
Ken
I think what he is saying is once you drill the hole in the front and tap it , it is much easier to change the chain case oil than to drain it from the back as it " is a pain " ---------------when the chain case is contaminated with water and I need to flush it , I will remove the front chain case cover and run up on a couple of blocks with the rear wheels to tilt it forward and use a air powered oil pump, (the kind you stick in a 5 gallon bucket ) to suck the oil out , then I will use a air powered part sprayer and flush the case out with a couple of gallons of diesel , suck it out , dry the left overs with a rag , it's faster and more effient than work thru the drain plug , there is still some oil/water in the axle tubes but it is minimal ---I use to 4x4 alot and would always be changing the oil in the axles , so similar to what you done I would remove the axle cover on my chevys and drill a hole then braze in a bushing then install a plug , you would get 95% out of it without removing the cover , on the Ford which didn't have a cover to remove or a plug to drain , it was a real help to drill a hole thru the carrier and tap a plug into it
 

A+ Skidloader

Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2008
Messages
6
Actually there is a drain plug at the rear of the chain case on most model in the last 15 years. (ones with the moror in sideways)
It is at the rear or the chaincase. Look undeneath the machine at the rear. There is a steel plate held on by 3 3/8” bolts (9/16” wrench)
Inside there is a plug facing forward to drain the chaincase and one facing rear to drain the fuel tank.
The plugs are rubber with a steel pin pushed in the center to exspand them tight. Pull the pin out with a vise grip and then the rubber plug
Ken
I know about the plug underneath. Bolts often wore to where a wrench won't fit them, and once you remove that rubber plug you better have another as it usually leaks if re-used, you must lay under a heavy machine that could fall on you, and it doesn't get nearly as empty. The plug in front is safer, easier, and does a better job of draining. On my little 463 ther is a cast weight that has to be removed, but not all that heavy and easier to remove than the bottom plate. I traded a machine with this plug added, and the dealer said, "hey, you drill and tap the chaincase, too. We've been doing it for years".
 

skidsteer.ca

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Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
I know about the plug underneath. Bolts often wore to where a wrench won't fit them, and once you remove that rubber plug you better have another as it usually leaks if re-used, you must lay under a heavy machine that could fall on you, and it doesn't get nearly as empty. The plug in front is safer, easier, and does a better job of draining. On my little 463 ther is a cast weight that has to be removed, but not all that heavy and easier to remove than the bottom plate. I traded a machine with this plug added, and the dealer said, "hey, you drill and tap the chaincase, too. We've been doing it for years".
Ok, that make sense I usually drive the machine up on some 6 by 6 timbers and lift the front a bit with the bucket to help it drain. But that sound like a worthwhile addition. Did you tap it 1/2 npt too or just 1/4, just wondering on the time it would take to drain?
Don't forget to inspect the bolts on the cover underneath, they have been know to fall off and something get in there and remove the rubber drain plug. Dealer up here had one that was run out of oil like that. Not sure what was damaged, would really depend on how long it was like that I guess.
Ken
 
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