Load Binders

Help Support SkidSteer Forum:

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
Brian
As for the binder, those things could be leathal. My father despite years of expieience and a careful work ethic got hit by the pipe when it slipped. No permanent damage but it left a mark that took weeks to go away.
I should post some pics of the one type of binder that is somewhat safer.
All over center binders, the handle points right at you when closed, and if the chain is real tight, opening them involve the handle flying around in a 180 degree arc as you release the stored energy.
The binder I like has a extra pivot point in the handle, when opening, you simply pivot the handle at this point about 120 degrees, so its pointing straight up, now when you open it it flys away from you and yoou just kick it with your heel to open it. No pipe needed.
Its not always easy to find a store that carries them, but its worth hunting for
 

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
It took me a bit but here
Binder closed
IMG_0754.JPG

Handle in the “ready to undo” position
IMG_0755.JPG

Ken
 

farmboy55

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 16, 2006
Messages
324
It took me a bit but here
Binder closed

Handle in the “ready to undo” position

Ken
Save yourself a lot of pain and get 2 radchet binders for one end of your skidsteer. Use the lever one on one end first then put the pull down with the radchets on the other end. dennis
 

sterlclan

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2004
Messages
528
Save yourself a lot of pain and get 2 radchet binders for one end of your skidsteer. Use the lever one on one end first then put the pull down with the radchets on the other end. dennis
I use two solid chains on the rear I pull forwards and bind the front the key is to pull two directions towards the rear and the front Jeff
 

buytheplace

Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2007
Messages
6
I agree with the above comments about using those pull open load binders such as the one pictured. I've never used them but I have some truck drivers take that pipe in arm, the shoulder or the side of the head after releasing the binder. For my money, I use the center ratchet type binder. It is just like a ratchet type wrench. You set the pivot to either retract or release it and then just crank it. It's hard to get hurt doing that and a bunch easier. I got mine at Harbor Freight Tools, a 9200lb binder about $22, but I think that you can get them at Northern Tool, Ohio Tool or Tractor supply. Good Luck
 

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
I agree with the above comments about using those pull open load binders such as the one pictured. I've never used them but I have some truck drivers take that pipe in arm, the shoulder or the side of the head after releasing the binder. For my money, I use the center ratchet type binder. It is just like a ratchet type wrench. You set the pivot to either retract or release it and then just crank it. It's hard to get hurt doing that and a bunch easier. I got mine at Harbor Freight Tools, a 9200lb binder about $22, but I think that you can get them at Northern Tool, Ohio Tool or Tractor supply. Good Luck
Most of the ratchet staps don't have a WLL (working load limit) near as high. Here your chains and binders must be marked, the one pictured has a 5400 lb WLL rating and is good with a 3/8 grade 70 chain.
These are the chains and binders our lowbed is equiped with. If you use ratchet straps you should have ones rated for 1/2 the weight of what your tieing down. The harbor freight binder 9200 lb rating must be “breaking strength”
Ken
 

lgammon

Active member
Joined
Jan 2, 2007
Messages
29
Most of the ratchet staps don't have a WLL (working load limit) near as high. Here your chains and binders must be marked, the one pictured has a 5400 lb WLL rating and is good with a 3/8 grade 70 chain.
These are the chains and binders our lowbed is equiped with. If you use ratchet straps you should have ones rated for 1/2 the weight of what your tieing down. The harbor freight binder 9200 lb rating must be “breaking strength”
Ken
i don't think he is talking about straps, we use ratcheting chain binders. they are the only way to go, i can't remember the last one that got loose on us. you can just keep cranking down and make sure that it is tight
 

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
i don't think he is talking about straps, we use ratcheting chain binders. they are the only way to go, i can't remember the last one that got loose on us. you can just keep cranking down and make sure that it is tight
Ok I have seen those too.
I think you would have to keeps the threads well oil all the time so they did not rust solid around here. We float down down alot of gravels roads and in the winter the ice melter they use on our roads will sieze up anything. Not sure how the threads would fair, might have to oil them after each trip in muddy or salt spray conditions.
Anyone else using the ratching one in these condition?
Ken
 

lgammon

Active member
Joined
Jan 2, 2007
Messages
29
Ok I have seen those too.
I think you would have to keeps the threads well oil all the time so they did not rust solid around here. We float down down alot of gravels roads and in the winter the ice melter they use on our roads will sieze up anything. Not sure how the threads would fair, might have to oil them after each trip in muddy or salt spray conditions.
Anyone else using the ratching one in these condition?
Ken
as the wise man said " rolling stone gathers no moss". we do unscrew ours a couple of times a year and pour motor oil all over the threads. but nothing that a little wd-40 won't fix
 
Top