Wish I had tracks

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500K_773

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Mar 5, 2004
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342
Things still haven't dried up yet around my yard. The snow is gone, but the ground is still frozen from 2' to 4' down beneath the surface. This is trapping the ground water and leaving things muddy and soft. I tried clearing some willow trees last weekend and did OK for awhile until the ground got too rutted up. I stopped before I got my 773 stuck and finished clearing by hand :(
If I had a track machine, I would have at least 3-4 weeks more of working weather a year. Not too mention is has been raining on and off the last week so things aren't drying up any faster. The T300 is looking better and better. My wife wants her pasture leveled and barn up soon, so maybe I can work a deal ;)
 

864wood

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Mar 27, 2004
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I was on a small backfill job with the concrete contractor. They had an S185 with loegrin tracks. They saw me show up and laughed! Thay had their machine stuck 5 times in two days and were doing the brunt of the work by hand. Needsless to say to job was bad but the tracks helped enormously. Dont think for a second that with tracks you can walk on water, but being carefull and not trying to work too fast I got it done. I cant live without them. The ground was so bad when I got done backblading, that when you walked on the backfill later it was walking on a loose waterbed. Wierd........
 

Team Fountain

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Mar 16, 2004
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61
I was on a small backfill job with the concrete contractor. They had an S185 with loegrin tracks. They saw me show up and laughed! Thay had their machine stuck 5 times in two days and were doing the brunt of the work by hand. Needsless to say to job was bad but the tracks helped enormously. Dont think for a second that with tracks you can walk on water, but being carefull and not trying to work too fast I got it done. I cant live without them. The ground was so bad when I got done backblading, that when you walked on the backfill later it was walking on a loose waterbed. Wierd........
I did a job Sunday that I would have walked away from with my S185. Had I been smart, I probably would have walked away anyhow. A flat had been carved in the side of a mountain with a backhoe. A Balcon retaining wall was placed at the back side of the flat and backfilled. All was good, except the spoils had been placed uphill rather than downhill. Basically, this meant running sideways on a 40 - 45 degree slope uphill from a new 7' tall retaining wall. There was a new pool in the flat, so if the wall gave way I probably would have drowned (or learned to walk on water real quick). My father was watching so I figured he'd let me know if it got too hairy. When I got done, Pop sorta just looked at me and shook his head.
 

Team Fountain

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Mar 16, 2004
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61
I did a job Sunday that I would have walked away from with my S185. Had I been smart, I probably would have walked away anyhow. A flat had been carved in the side of a mountain with a backhoe. A Balcon retaining wall was placed at the back side of the flat and backfilled. All was good, except the spoils had been placed uphill rather than downhill. Basically, this meant running sideways on a 40 - 45 degree slope uphill from a new 7' tall retaining wall. There was a new pool in the flat, so if the wall gave way I probably would have drowned (or learned to walk on water real quick). My father was watching so I figured he'd let me know if it got too hairy. When I got done, Pop sorta just looked at me and shook his head.
I should mention, the homeowner called the backhoe operator to come back and do what I did and he said “you gotta be kidding”. I have to agree with that guy. There's NO WAY I would have put my backhoe on that hill. Really makes you wonder what the guy was thinking when he piled all his spoils up there in the first place. Must have been a homeowner miscommunication.....
 

Tigerotor77W

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Apr 29, 2004
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268
I should mention, the homeowner called the backhoe operator to come back and do what I did and he said “you gotta be kidding”. I have to agree with that guy. There's NO WAY I would have put my backhoe on that hill. Really makes you wonder what the guy was thinking when he piled all his spoils up there in the first place. Must have been a homeowner miscommunication.....
Congratulations on doing a suicide mission. :) When will the next story come out?
 

500K_773

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342
Congratulations on doing a suicide mission. :) When will the next story come out?
I rototilled part of my field and a dead section of the lawn late last week. I had to cross a low section of the backyard to get to one area. After finishing that area, I had to cross the low area again. Guess what, I sunk on the way back. There I sat sitting on the belly pan with the tires spinning.
emotion-12.gif
Lucky I was able to get my truck close enough to yard it out with a tow strap, otherwise it could have been a few hour process getting it out. Another incident to influence my decision to buy a T300.
 

500K_773

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Mar 5, 2004
Messages
342
I rototilled part of my field and a dead section of the lawn late last week. I had to cross a low section of the backyard to get to one area. After finishing that area, I had to cross the low area again. Guess what, I sunk on the way back. There I sat sitting on the belly pan with the tires spinning. Lucky I was able to get my truck close enough to yard it out with a tow strap, otherwise it could have been a few hour process getting it out. Another incident to influence my decision to buy a T300.
Team Fountain,
I have had to utilize backhoe loaders in some hilly terrain that required some sidehilling. I swung the backhoe to the uphill side to offer more counterweight to keep me on all fours. I also lowered the downhill outrigger about 3/4 of the way in case it began to tip. Not the best feeling in the world, but was able to get the job done. I am sure a track loader or a compact excavator would have been better suited for the job, especially with a lower center of gravity.
 

Team Fountain

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Mar 16, 2004
Messages
61
Team Fountain,
I have had to utilize backhoe loaders in some hilly terrain that required some sidehilling. I swung the backhoe to the uphill side to offer more counterweight to keep me on all fours. I also lowered the downhill outrigger about 3/4 of the way in case it began to tip. Not the best feeling in the world, but was able to get the job done. I am sure a track loader or a compact excavator would have been better suited for the job, especially with a lower center of gravity.
500K,
My biggest concern with the backhoe would have been that the wall below me was new. Doing it with the backhoe, I would have pulled the spoils further up the hill with the hoe, and them scooped and removed. This was definitely one of those jobs that could be done faster with the T300. Now on the other end, where I was taking the spoils, I wish I had the backhoe. Would have saved a little time. Note to self -- buy another Peterbilt / trailer and hire a driver so I can have everything with me in case I need it. Wife will understand
emotion-5.gif
 

Tigerotor77W

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268
500K,
My biggest concern with the backhoe would have been that the wall below me was new. Doing it with the backhoe, I would have pulled the spoils further up the hill with the hoe, and them scooped and removed. This was definitely one of those jobs that could be done faster with the T300. Now on the other end, where I was taking the spoils, I wish I had the backhoe. Would have saved a little time. Note to self -- buy another Peterbilt / trailer and hire a driver so I can have everything with me in case I need it. Wife will understand
500, I don't know your situation too well, but it seems that a track machine would be nice for you. If you don't quite need the lifting power (mainly just height and reach) of the 300, look at the 250. It's only 300 lbs lighter than the 300 and will just about lift the same loads w/o tipping. (I mean tipping load is above 6000 -- so no need to worry.) I dunno. I always feel bad when machines get stuck. SPeaking of which... how deep was the mud you were in?
 

500K_773

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Mar 5, 2004
Messages
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500, I don't know your situation too well, but it seems that a track machine would be nice for you. If you don't quite need the lifting power (mainly just height and reach) of the 300, look at the 250. It's only 300 lbs lighter than the 300 and will just about lift the same loads w/o tipping. (I mean tipping load is above 6000 -- so no need to worry.) I dunno. I always feel bad when machines get stuck. SPeaking of which... how deep was the mud you were in?
Bobcat S250,
I want a machine bigger than my 773 which is the same size as the T190. I really like the vertical lift path, so the radial lift of the T250 is out. It only leaves the T300. I'll probably get a high flow machine to run bigger attachment (ie.: 90“ Brushcat will spin the blades faster and work better with high flow). What's the price difference between the T250 and the T300? I think my dealer quoted me about $52,000 for the T300 with the Gold Package.
The mud was not too deep, just about 3/4 of the rear tire was buried. I seem to work in soft conditions more than I would like. The track machine would perform better and I currently do with tracks. I would hate to sell my 773 and just have the T300. The track machines are not really recommended for use on snow and ice, but I see a T200 utilized to keep sidewalks clear in the wintertime. The tracks may have more difficulty in icy slopes
I really want a 337 or 435 compact excavator, so the T300 might have to wait. I may just spend the $3500-$5000 to get tracks to go over the tires of my 773 for now.
 

Tigerotor77W

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Apr 29, 2004
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268
Bobcat S250,
I want a machine bigger than my 773 which is the same size as the T190. I really like the vertical lift path, so the radial lift of the T250 is out. It only leaves the T300. I'll probably get a high flow machine to run bigger attachment (ie.: 90“ Brushcat will spin the blades faster and work better with high flow). What's the price difference between the T250 and the T300? I think my dealer quoted me about $52,000 for the T300 with the Gold Package.
The mud was not too deep, just about 3/4 of the rear tire was buried. I seem to work in soft conditions more than I would like. The track machine would perform better and I currently do with tracks. I would hate to sell my 773 and just have the T300. The track machines are not really recommended for use on snow and ice, but I see a T200 utilized to keep sidewalks clear in the wintertime. The tracks may have more difficulty in icy slopes
I really want a 337 or 435 compact excavator, so the T300 might have to wait. I may just spend the $3500-$5000 to get tracks to go over the tires of my 773 for now.
I see... I believe that Bobcat and Cat are the only manufacturers with a vertical lift anyhow. Hmm. The T300 will be rather expensive -- have you thought of going used? I know you'll sacrifice a buncha past maintenance knowledge, but... I don't know. The 435 -- is the 430 big enough? I know the 435 is about a ton heavier than the 430 and will be more expensive (as if you needed me to point that out). Tracks -- if you want a machine with good mudability, the larger models do work better. If you, say, traded the 773 in for a S250 and then... I'm getting carried away here. Let me think and maybe I can think a bit better. Xing
 

500K_773

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Mar 5, 2004
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342
I see... I believe that Bobcat and Cat are the only manufacturers with a vertical lift anyhow. Hmm. The T300 will be rather expensive -- have you thought of going used? I know you'll sacrifice a buncha past maintenance knowledge, but... I don't know. The 435 -- is the 430 big enough? I know the 435 is about a ton heavier than the 430 and will be more expensive (as if you needed me to point that out). Tracks -- if you want a machine with good mudability, the larger models do work better. If you, say, traded the 773 in for a S250 and then... I'm getting carried away here. Let me think and maybe I can think a bit better. Xing
The new T300 is more expensive than the smaller machines and used machines, but I feel I'd be getting MUCH more machine for the added expense. Right now the tax benefits of buying new are too good to pass up. I haven't seen any used T300 or T250 for sale and low hour used T200's are in the mid 30's to $40,000.
As far as excavators go, the 337 and 435 are barely large enough for my needs. I tried a 331 (same size as the 430) last year and found it much too small. The Cat 304CR is a nice alternative (about midway between the 430 and 435 Bobcat) for only about $42,000 new. Really I should get a excavator that has about a 18' dig depth (comparable to a extenda-hoe backhoe loader), but I would have to upgrade my truck and trailer to haul it. Not to mention the HUGE jump in price.
I hate to say it, but a backhoe loader with a extendable stick would give me more loader capabilities and deeper dig depth. Although I would not have the track performance of either the T300 or a compact excavator. Also the backhoe loader would be a lot larger in size and could lose some performance in some smaller residential applications with tight working quarters. I can't have my cake and eat it :)
 

Tigerotor77W

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Apr 29, 2004
Messages
268
The new T300 is more expensive than the smaller machines and used machines, but I feel I'd be getting MUCH more machine for the added expense. Right now the tax benefits of buying new are too good to pass up. I haven't seen any used T300 or T250 for sale and low hour used T200's are in the mid 30's to $40,000.
As far as excavators go, the 337 and 435 are barely large enough for my needs. I tried a 331 (same size as the 430) last year and found it much too small. The Cat 304CR is a nice alternative (about midway between the 430 and 435 Bobcat) for only about $42,000 new. Really I should get a excavator that has about a 18' dig depth (comparable to a extenda-hoe backhoe loader), but I would have to upgrade my truck and trailer to haul it. Not to mention the HUGE jump in price.
I hate to say it, but a backhoe loader with a extendable stick would give me more loader capabilities and deeper dig depth. Although I would not have the track performance of either the T300 or a compact excavator. Also the backhoe loader would be a lot larger in size and could lose some performance in some smaller residential applications with tight working quarters. I can't have my cake and eat it :)
Wait... the 337 is too small but the 304CR is just right? *scratches head* As far as Cat goes, it also has one vertical lift model that fits -- the 287B. I'm a Cat fan, too, but my skid steer loyalties are with Bobcat. No further comment, Your Honor.
 

500K_773

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Mar 5, 2004
Messages
342
Wait... the 337 is too small but the 304CR is just right? *scratches head* As far as Cat goes, it also has one vertical lift model that fits -- the 287B. I'm a Cat fan, too, but my skid steer loyalties are with Bobcat. No further comment, Your Honor.
The 337 is smaller than I would ultimately like to have, but would do the job at hand. For about $14,000 less, the Cat 304CR would dig 1' less and lift less load (ie. septic tanks) but could do most of the work I needed to do. A Cat 420 backhoe loader with an extendable stick (~18' dig depth) is about $75,000. About $20,000 more than the 337, would perform more work due to the bigger size and more power, but may also perform less in soft crowded conditions compared to the 337.
Right now, I am trying to size all my equipment to be able to haul around with my 1 ton truck and my trailer. The truck is only LEGAL to pull 12,500# and the trailer weighs 2000#, so leaves 10,500# for the excavator. The 337 is definately more than this weight and the 304CR is about 500# over this weight.
The T300 would fit just fine on the trailer though :)
 

Tigerotor77W

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Apr 29, 2004
Messages
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The 337 is smaller than I would ultimately like to have, but would do the job at hand. For about $14,000 less, the Cat 304CR would dig 1' less and lift less load (ie. septic tanks) but could do most of the work I needed to do. A Cat 420 backhoe loader with an extendable stick (~18' dig depth) is about $75,000. About $20,000 more than the 337, would perform more work due to the bigger size and more power, but may also perform less in soft crowded conditions compared to the 337.
Right now, I am trying to size all my equipment to be able to haul around with my 1 ton truck and my trailer. The truck is only LEGAL to pull 12,500# and the trailer weighs 2000#, so leaves 10,500# for the excavator. The 337 is definately more than this weight and the 304CR is about 500# over this weight.
The T300 would fit just fine on the trailer though :)
If you're not yet into heavy digging or pipe-setting, I would actually recommend the T300 first with a backhoe attachment. An excavator won't give you as much versatility as a track loader -- and you could always dig smaller trenches with a loader. Just a thought.
 
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