Letter......

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perry

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Joined
Aug 22, 2006
Messages
869
Did you guys get a letter from the company that bought BC?. Got mine yesterday assuring me 'quality customer service' would continue. Wait till I write them a letter about their BS... CS........
 

bobcat_ron

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Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
334
LOL Ron, you never fail to disappoint me in you uum *love* of Bobcat and Deere.
Well what can you expect, my jack hammer sure runs a lot better on my Cat than the Bobcrap ever could do, because of the open loop system, the out going hydraulic line from the hammer doesn't shake and rattle anymore, on the Bobcat, it would eat a 2 Manifold quick couplers every year.
 

skidboy

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Joined
Jan 3, 2007
Messages
94
Well what can you expect, my jack hammer sure runs a lot better on my Cat than the Bobcrap ever could do, because of the open loop system, the out going hydraulic line from the hammer doesn't shake and rattle anymore, on the Bobcat, it would eat a 2 Manifold quick couplers every year.
What sort of hammer do you run ?
I have never had a problem with a Bobcat hammer on a Bobcat
 

bobcat_ron

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Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
334
What sort of hammer do you run ?
I have never had a problem with a Bobcat hammer on a Bobcat
It's a Daemo Hammer, 725 impact pound class, I've run Bobcat hammers and they are just useless, they require full hydraulic power and engine RPM's to achieve a mere 500 impact pounds on a high flow equipped machine, my hammer only requires 10-12 GPM's to achieve 725 pounds, that saves fuel and time, problem is that Bobcat's hydraulic systems are closed circuits, so all the hot and pressurized oil coming out of the hammer stays inside the system and cannot be cooled properly, so over time an O-ring bursts or a complete failure like a hose gives out, Cat's system is a TRUE open loop, all oil from the drive, loader and auxiliary systems returns to the tank and the pressure is vented off, the oil is them circulated by a 5 GPM gear pump with a 300 PSI rating from the tank to the cooler, through the filter and back into the tank, this pump also charges the valve banks and pumps with oil pressure as well as drives the hydraulic fan. Good example is, after 2 minutes of continuous hammer work (with no stopping) My Cat's lines are body temperature, the Bobcat's lines are way too hot too touch with bare fingers, there's the difference, brush cutting after 30 minutes is the same. The reason you say you haven't had a problem with running BC hammers is due to the BC hammer design, they have an internal accumulator in it, but that robs power and they need full power to run, they also don't weigh as much so they vibrate REAL bad inside the casings, my hammer weighs in at 1400 pounds, I used a 2 inch thick plate to mount the hammer to the bracket and that added 700 pounds of additional weight, that keeps the vibrations and impact force in the point where it belongs. If you want more info, please contact me through either Lawnsite or HeavyEquipmentForums, I use the same name there too, I hate posting pics here and there is a lot to show and tell.
 

WebbCo

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 19, 2006
Messages
177
It's a Daemo Hammer, 725 impact pound class, I've run Bobcat hammers and they are just useless, they require full hydraulic power and engine RPM's to achieve a mere 500 impact pounds on a high flow equipped machine, my hammer only requires 10-12 GPM's to achieve 725 pounds, that saves fuel and time, problem is that Bobcat's hydraulic systems are closed circuits, so all the hot and pressurized oil coming out of the hammer stays inside the system and cannot be cooled properly, so over time an O-ring bursts or a complete failure like a hose gives out, Cat's system is a TRUE open loop, all oil from the drive, loader and auxiliary systems returns to the tank and the pressure is vented off, the oil is them circulated by a 5 GPM gear pump with a 300 PSI rating from the tank to the cooler, through the filter and back into the tank, this pump also charges the valve banks and pumps with oil pressure as well as drives the hydraulic fan. Good example is, after 2 minutes of continuous hammer work (with no stopping) My Cat's lines are body temperature, the Bobcat's lines are way too hot too touch with bare fingers, there's the difference, brush cutting after 30 minutes is the same. The reason you say you haven't had a problem with running BC hammers is due to the BC hammer design, they have an internal accumulator in it, but that robs power and they need full power to run, they also don't weigh as much so they vibrate REAL bad inside the casings, my hammer weighs in at 1400 pounds, I used a 2 inch thick plate to mount the hammer to the bracket and that added 700 pounds of additional weight, that keeps the vibrations and impact force in the point where it belongs. If you want more info, please contact me through either Lawnsite or HeavyEquipmentForums, I use the same name there too, I hate posting pics here and there is a lot to show and tell.
Rons always good for a laugh is right, but whats going to happen when you fall out of love for that Cat? Example, when the undercarriage totally falls apart. Plastic parts, tracks with out steel back bones, the price of all that wont be cheap. I get calls everyday looking for replacement undercarriage for CATS, There where many venders at ConExpo pushing all those replacement parts. Oh, then there is the rumor that CAT is doing away with the current undercarriage, due to, too much failure. They will change to a different version of the Loegering system currently available for tire to track machines.Our local Cat dealer is pushing tire machines until the new units become available.
PS Bobcat will introduce a new suspension track machine soon too, using basically the same system currently found on production machines now.
 

bobcat_ron

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
334
Rons always good for a laugh is right, but whats going to happen when you fall out of love for that Cat? Example, when the undercarriage totally falls apart. Plastic parts, tracks with out steel back bones, the price of all that wont be cheap. I get calls everyday looking for replacement undercarriage for CATS, There where many venders at ConExpo pushing all those replacement parts. Oh, then there is the rumor that CAT is doing away with the current undercarriage, due to, too much failure. They will change to a different version of the Loegering system currently available for tire to track machines.Our local Cat dealer is pushing tire machines until the new units become available.
PS Bobcat will introduce a new suspension track machine soon too, using basically the same system currently found on production machines now.
Your response is typical of every Bobcat sales or part dealer, they don't understand how to maximize the ASV U/C system to their benefits and needs, for example, ASV's tracks don't need a "steel backbone" because the rubber has more give to it allowing it to flex over rough terrain, I'm not talking about driving over sharp 6 inch rock or all out rock wall climbing, it's the day to day driving over gravel with pot holes or any other un even terrain where harder rubber tracks with steel will simply crack and the rubber will start chipping off. Yes, Cat is doing away with the ASV U/C, but it will remain an option for the MTL crowds that love the system, but they will have a traditional steel/rubber track system that uses ASV's torsion axles to maximize ground contact. Oh and the Bobcat "Roller Suspension" set up is a complete joke, come over to Lawnsite, some say it looks like it was designed by a bunch of grade 12 High School students in shop class, I mean 1 inch of travel?? ASV alone as 4 inches on the torsion axles and 2 1/2 inches in the bogie rollers!!
 

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