753 With 5000 Hours Is this allot?

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Crashly

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Feb 23, 2006
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I am looking a a 753 with 5000 hours at a bobcat dealership. They are asking 7k for the unit. It has the Kubota 2203 and I am wondering how many hours these will go if they are cared for? Are there any good or bad years in the 753 linup? Does anybody have any advice on these units that I should be aware of? Anybody have one for sale? Im in SO California. Thanks
 

Tazza

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It really depends on what you want to do with it, if you want to do commercial work with it i would suggest you stay away from it. If you just want it for around home a 5,000 hour unit would be fine. The main problem you have is you can't tell if it has indeed been cared for. I would goto the dealer and give the machine a go, but make sure the engine is stone cold, see how hard it is to start. If its difficult to start the engine has low compression which will cost you a few thousand to fix.
$7,000 still sounds pretty good for that machine, its so cheap because of the hours, its really only suitable for home/farm use.
I believe most if not all Bobcats are bullet proof, the only problem is the engines. The Kubota engines they use are VERY good and reliable, just don't let them run out of water, they love to crack heads.
I'm sure someone else with one of these machines will let you know if they thought they were good or bad.
 

trg753

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I have a 753 with 4100 hrs. and have developed a leak in the hydraulic pump. Otherwise, the machine runs good, is smooth and am happy with it. I will be fixing the pump this next week. Is this a 753 or a G model?
 

Crashly

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I have a 753 with 4100 hrs. and have developed a leak in the hydraulic pump. Otherwise, the machine runs good, is smooth and am happy with it. I will be fixing the pump this next week. Is this a 753 or a G model?
I do not know the year or modle yet of the 735 I will be finding that out on Monday. Do the 735's have all electronic brain? I was hoping to stay away from all the electronic stuff as much as possible.
 

Tazza

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I do not know the year or modle yet of the 735 I will be finding that out on Monday. Do the 735's have all electronic brain? I was hoping to stay away from all the electronic stuff as much as possible.
The 743 was the last of the non electronic machines, after the 743 they all started going electronic. I am just un-sure how many things are electronically controlled in the 753's. I too try to steer away from the BICS machines as the price tag of a new computer scares me.
 

Crashly

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The 743 was the last of the non electronic machines, after the 743 they all started going electronic. I am just un-sure how many things are electronically controlled in the 753's. I too try to steer away from the BICS machines as the price tag of a new computer scares me.
When did they Start making the bcis machines? What does BICS stand for?
 

skidsteer.ca

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When did they Start making the bcis machines? What does BICS stand for?
5000 hrs is quite a few. Bigger diesels generally have a 10000 hr life sometimes more. Unsure about the little Kubota, they may run this long as well. I think the biggest thing limiting life span in a skid steer is that these types of machines tend to get run just a few minutes to hours at a time. Where a lot of other diesels put in a "day long" shift.
If its in good shape, they will start down to 0 degrees F with just the glow plugs (10/30 motor oil)
My 553 is beginning to need injectors, and if you set the idle low on a cold start you can hear the 3rd cylinder start firing after a few seconds. When cold it fires and fires a few times before it starts. Not just hit the key and its running, ( how it should be)
Even so the "cold start" smoke is gone in 20 to 30 seconds. Which is how a 753 should be too. I had a 93 753 from 2100 to 3300 hrs. I sold it because t was too small for my needs. Not because it was a bad machine. I had no major problems with it 93 Was about the last year you could get a machine without the BICS (bobcat interlock control system) Its not really a computer. Just a safety system.
It has a seat bar sensor, a seat load sensor. when both of these sensors sense the operator sitting in the seat, and the seat bar down. A power feed is sent to unlock the park solenoid, and another power is sent to a valve to unlock the boom lift and bucket tilt functions. If it fails it can be easily bypassed. But remember it is a safety feature.
My 93 had a park brake (not a park pin) It could be force to move by a careless operator with the park break on. A bics park brake will not move (stalls engine first) unless you smash it up. You can remove 2 bolts to defeat it if necessary.
The computer part comes in with the BOSS system which my 93 had. It monitors water temp, engine oil press, hydro charge pump press, hydro temp, fuel level, air filter, coolant level, volts, and I probably forgetting some. Its is great in theory. If any system gets out of range it will beep at the operator to wake him up, and then shut down the engine if its anything other than fuel level or air filter. But this system require several new sensors in the hour I used my machine at $35 to $50 a pop to keep it working. Around 3000 hours the display began throwing out unusual gibberish codes and shutting off the engine. We checked the ground wires to no avail. The local Bobcat dealer lent me a used computer for try, and that solved the problem. 100 hrs no trouble. But $800 used and new was 1500??
So I drilled the rivets out of the old computers tin case and took the printed circuit board to a local electronics guy. He test what he could on it and tighten a few ground screws that were neither loose or tight. But that did the trick, and it work properly until I sold it, and I just spoke with the buyer the other day, 18 mo later, and he says he has had no problems. But does not use it a lot. I'm unsure of the present hours.
Imo I could live without the boss, but I think it is standard in the G and newer series. The 753 is a very good all around small to mid sized machine in my experience. As they got newer they upped the hp and hydraulic flow and pressure some. A local tech told me they have much less trouble with the boss on the G series machines. Mine was not even a C series yet. I think the BICS became std equipment with the C.
When I sold it the engine still run its 100 hours between oil changes without adding. I did no hyd work to it other then one blown hose.
The most serious failure was a broken pin from the loader arm to the bottom of the bobtach. And there was a update to make that stronger. Also there was a crack in the loader boom cross member just beside the tilt cylinder on the top side of the boom. Someone had re welded it before I got it, and I had to re weld it once also.
With 5000 hours, I'd want to rent it for 25 hours or so. Keep a very close eye on engine and hydraulic oil consumption. Both should be nothing. Remove the oil fill cap with the engine running and look for piston ring blow by. It should be minimal, and definitely not a puff, puff, puff, which indicates one cylinder that is seriously low on compression.
How much slop do the pins have, especially the tilt cylinder at the bobtach, this one wears the fastest. ---If you lift a bucket full of dirt in the air, none of the loader cylinders should leak down, leave it sit for a few minutes to see.
With those hours, I think the pins have been changed a least once. Also are the pins tight in the frame of the machine. Because there are no bushing in some of those places, and repairs are not as simple as hammering in a new bushing and pin. Consult the parts manual if they are loose, to see if there is a bushing, or if a new pin boss needs welded to the frame. (read not a simple fix) Look for drips underneath. See how it starts when cold, and how soon it stops smoking. A warm engine should have no smoke unless it is really working hard.
Look at the engine coolant, to see if it is contaminated with oily gunk, a sign of a bad head gasket.
After it has been used an hour or so. (good and warm) idle the machine down and see if it will still turn around, left then right (on dry pavement) at low rpm, do both side respond and act the same. will the lift and tilt functions stall the idling engine, or at least make it grunt. A sign of good hyd pressure. Is the lift function strong, trys to lift the back of the machine off the ground..
Has the dealer repaired anything on it , or are they aware of the history. Type of work it did, maintenance records. Mine spent many hours running a hoe, which is pretty easy on the machine. Just sitting there pumping oil. As opposed to something like a jack hammer, pounding on it. Any good dealer should let you try it out, or rent it for a reasonable price. Should have done a flow meter test on the pumps, and maybe compression and injectors tests.
With those hours it got to have some wear, just be sure its not wore out. Sorry for being long winded.
Regards Ken
 

Crashly

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Joined
Feb 23, 2006
Messages
17
5000 hrs is quite a few. Bigger diesels generally have a 10000 hr life sometimes more. Unsure about the little Kubota, they may run this long as well. I think the biggest thing limiting life span in a skid steer is that these types of machines tend to get run just a few minutes to hours at a time. Where a lot of other diesels put in a "day long" shift.
If its in good shape, they will start down to 0 degrees F with just the glow plugs (10/30 motor oil)
My 553 is beginning to need injectors, and if you set the idle low on a cold start you can hear the 3rd cylinder start firing after a few seconds. When cold it fires and fires a few times before it starts. Not just hit the key and its running, ( how it should be)
Even so the "cold start" smoke is gone in 20 to 30 seconds. Which is how a 753 should be too. I had a 93 753 from 2100 to 3300 hrs. I sold it because t was too small for my needs. Not because it was a bad machine. I had no major problems with it 93 Was about the last year you could get a machine without the BICS (bobcat interlock control system) Its not really a computer. Just a safety system.
It has a seat bar sensor, a seat load sensor. when both of these sensors sense the operator sitting in the seat, and the seat bar down. A power feed is sent to unlock the park solenoid, and another power is sent to a valve to unlock the boom lift and bucket tilt functions. If it fails it can be easily bypassed. But remember it is a safety feature.
My 93 had a park brake (not a park pin) It could be force to move by a careless operator with the park break on. A bics park brake will not move (stalls engine first) unless you smash it up. You can remove 2 bolts to defeat it if necessary.
The computer part comes in with the BOSS system which my 93 had. It monitors water temp, engine oil press, hydro charge pump press, hydro temp, fuel level, air filter, coolant level, volts, and I probably forgetting some. Its is great in theory. If any system gets out of range it will beep at the operator to wake him up, and then shut down the engine if its anything other than fuel level or air filter. But this system require several new sensors in the hour I used my machine at $35 to $50 a pop to keep it working. Around 3000 hours the display began throwing out unusual gibberish codes and shutting off the engine. We checked the ground wires to no avail. The local Bobcat dealer lent me a used computer for try, and that solved the problem. 100 hrs no trouble. But $800 used and new was 1500??
So I drilled the rivets out of the old computers tin case and took the printed circuit board to a local electronics guy. He test what he could on it and tighten a few ground screws that were neither loose or tight. But that did the trick, and it work properly until I sold it, and I just spoke with the buyer the other day, 18 mo later, and he says he has had no problems. But does not use it a lot. I'm unsure of the present hours.
Imo I could live without the boss, but I think it is standard in the G and newer series. The 753 is a very good all around small to mid sized machine in my experience. As they got newer they upped the hp and hydraulic flow and pressure some. A local tech told me they have much less trouble with the boss on the G series machines. Mine was not even a C series yet. I think the BICS became std equipment with the C.
When I sold it the engine still run its 100 hours between oil changes without adding. I did no hyd work to it other then one blown hose.
The most serious failure was a broken pin from the loader arm to the bottom of the bobtach. And there was a update to make that stronger. Also there was a crack in the loader boom cross member just beside the tilt cylinder on the top side of the boom. Someone had re welded it before I got it, and I had to re weld it once also.
With 5000 hours, I'd want to rent it for 25 hours or so. Keep a very close eye on engine and hydraulic oil consumption. Both should be nothing. Remove the oil fill cap with the engine running and look for piston ring blow by. It should be minimal, and definitely not a puff, puff, puff, which indicates one cylinder that is seriously low on compression.
How much slop do the pins have, especially the tilt cylinder at the bobtach, this one wears the fastest. ---If you lift a bucket full of dirt in the air, none of the loader cylinders should leak down, leave it sit for a few minutes to see.
With those hours, I think the pins have been changed a least once. Also are the pins tight in the frame of the machine. Because there are no bushing in some of those places, and repairs are not as simple as hammering in a new bushing and pin. Consult the parts manual if they are loose, to see if there is a bushing, or if a new pin boss needs welded to the frame. (read not a simple fix) Look for drips underneath. See how it starts when cold, and how soon it stops smoking. A warm engine should have no smoke unless it is really working hard.
Look at the engine coolant, to see if it is contaminated with oily gunk, a sign of a bad head gasket.
After it has been used an hour or so. (good and warm) idle the machine down and see if it will still turn around, left then right (on dry pavement) at low rpm, do both side respond and act the same. will the lift and tilt functions stall the idling engine, or at least make it grunt. A sign of good hyd pressure. Is the lift function strong, trys to lift the back of the machine off the ground..
Has the dealer repaired anything on it , or are they aware of the history. Type of work it did, maintenance records. Mine spent many hours running a hoe, which is pretty easy on the machine. Just sitting there pumping oil. As opposed to something like a jack hammer, pounding on it. Any good dealer should let you try it out, or rent it for a reasonable price. Should have done a flow meter test on the pumps, and maybe compression and injectors tests.
With those hours it got to have some wear, just be sure its not wore out. Sorry for being long winded.
Regards Ken
Thanks Ken for the Reply. I am probably going to go look at the machine on Tuesday. I will definately be looking at all ofthe pivot points and any areas where there couild be stress cracks. This particular machine also has the rear stabalizers I wonder what they supported when they were being used. Is there any way to tell if there was a backhoe attached? I do not know of any other reason to have the aft stabalizers other than that. Does anybody know where I can find that article on evaluating used skid steers?
 

Tazza

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Thanks Ken for the Reply. I am probably going to go look at the machine on Tuesday. I will definately be looking at all ofthe pivot points and any areas where there couild be stress cracks. This particular machine also has the rear stabalizers I wonder what they supported when they were being used. Is there any way to tell if there was a backhoe attached? I do not know of any other reason to have the aft stabalizers other than that. Does anybody know where I can find that article on evaluating used skid steers?
Check above the front wheels, there are about 4 holes drilled in the chassis, if there are marks like something was bolted there, there is a good chance that a backhoe was attached, or at least the mounting balls were. If they had rear stabilizers attached there is a very good chance there was a backhoe attached.
 

skidsteer.ca

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Check above the front wheels, there are about 4 holes drilled in the chassis, if there are marks like something was bolted there, there is a good chance that a backhoe was attached, or at least the mounting balls were. If they had rear stabilizers attached there is a very good chance there was a backhoe attached.
As far as articles go, not that I'm aware of. if you find something let us know. If it had jacks, it likely run a hoe, I never had rear jacks, but some ad them for extra downforce, to keep the front end from lifting when digging. It would have also had a bracket bolted to the frame on each side, as Tazz mentioned. If it has the "boss" on it every code it has set can be recalled. (not sure if the dealer can clear these) ask them to show you the codes in it. Hour meter can't be changed on boss machines. On the std machine anyone witth $40 can stick another hour meter in it. But I doubt anyone rolled it back to 5000. With those hours, I'd want it to be in good shape, because one with 3500 or 4000 hours is not worth alot more. You just have to find it. Ken
 
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