post hole diggers

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jackel440

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Jan 3, 2008
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51
hey guys, I am looking to get a post hole auger attachment for my ls170 to dig holes here on the farm.I have been looking at different models on the net,but i keep coming back to the one that Quick Attach sells.they have for sale for 1795$ right now i think.they sent me a catalog in the mail with a sale flyer.I don't have much rock here.might hit a small on every now and then.What do you guys have?what should i look out for before buying one? thanks Aaron
 

Tazza

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Dec 7, 2004
Messages
16,840
When you get an auger i would look at getting a set of weights for the front. The more weight you have at the front the more you can apply to the auger to drill easier. Thats tha main problem where i live, we have shale and clay (mostly shale). When we need holes drilled we need to get an excivator as it has so much more weight to drill, mounted to a SS it just didn't have the down pressure required to do anything. It will drill but its real slow going.
 

triad

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Nov 10, 2007
Messages
65
There website says $2695. but it doesn't sound too bad. I like to check contractor auctions this time of year, I usually find some good buys. The problem is I don't always have the money that I would like to. Steve
 

skidsteer.ca

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Jan 20, 2006
Messages
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Jackel
Here is a link to the auger Quick Attach /Erskine sells.
http://www.skidsteer.ca/19earthauger.pdf
443 kbs, takes a minute on dial up.
Just incase you don't want to wait for the catolog to come.
All their products are on my website, just under the Erskine name.
I have a Bobcat model 15c with 12 and 18" dia bits (had them before I became involved with Erskine) and it works well in our heavy clay and gravel soils. They have plenty of torque and can turn bits in the 30 to 36" diameter. At times I can stall the 18", but often I can wind it in the ground like a anchor. Unless your drilling shale or through frost, they go in the ground almost to good. You can exceed the lift capacity of your loader and may have to reverse them a bit, them lift the auger out. Stones are usually no problem up to 5 or 6", the larger bits bring them up better as there is more room in the flighting.
If you would like a quote on the drive unit, bit(s) and freight to your zip code, just shoot me a email and I'll get you a figure.
Ken
[email protected]
 
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J

jackel440

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Joined
Jan 3, 2008
Messages
51
Jackel
Here is a link to the auger Quick Attach /Erskine sells.
http://www.skidsteer.ca/19earthauger.pdf
443 kbs, takes a minute on dial up.
Just incase you don't want to wait for the catolog to come.
All their products are on my website, just under the Erskine name.
I have a Bobcat model 15c with 12 and 18" dia bits (had them before I became involved with Erskine) and it works well in our heavy clay and gravel soils. They have plenty of torque and can turn bits in the 30 to 36" diameter. At times I can stall the 18", but often I can wind it in the ground like a anchor. Unless your drilling shale or through frost, they go in the ground almost to good. You can exceed the lift capacity of your loader and may have to reverse them a bit, them lift the auger out. Stones are usually no problem up to 5 or 6", the larger bits bring them up better as there is more room in the flighting.
If you would like a quote on the drive unit, bit(s) and freight to your zip code, just shoot me a email and I'll get you a figure.
Ken
[email protected]
I did get the catalog and the sale flyer.Thats why i was asking about thier outfit.I like the looks of it.looks heavy duty enough that i will never hurt it.I would think I would have plenty of down pressure with the skid steer to dig holes.Since my experiance digging holes is with my utility tractor with out down pressure.I did use a case uniloader along time ago to drill some holes and it worked awesome. I also thought i could reuse my bits i have for my tractors digger with an adapter if i need them
 
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jackel440

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Joined
Jan 3, 2008
Messages
51
I did get the catalog and the sale flyer.Thats why i was asking about thier outfit.I like the looks of it.looks heavy duty enough that i will never hurt it.I would think I would have plenty of down pressure with the skid steer to dig holes.Since my experiance digging holes is with my utility tractor with out down pressure.I did use a case uniloader along time ago to drill some holes and it worked awesome. I also thought i could reuse my bits i have for my tractors digger with an adapter if i need them
What is the better output shaft the hex or round style?I have the round style on the utility tractor.Just wondered what is more common.
 

skidsteer.ca

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Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
What is the better output shaft the hex or round style?I have the round style on the utility tractor.Just wondered what is more common.
The hex is considered more heavy duty. But it is a bit tough to hook and unhook to the drive unit. Dirt gets in between the output shaft and the female on the bit and you do not have the option to rotate the bit on the shaft to help work the grit out and get it on far enough to get the pin in.
I have the round style where there is no hex to turn the bit, all the torque must be held by the 7/8" pin on each side of the bit. It takes alot to shear a 7/8 pin in 2 places at once. So unless you want some very large bits, and use it in tough conditions, I'd stay with the round. In these parts it is more common also. Maybe check with any local rental center to see what they use just incase you need to rent.
Ken
 
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jackel440

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Joined
Jan 3, 2008
Messages
51
The hex is considered more heavy duty. But it is a bit tough to hook and unhook to the drive unit. Dirt gets in between the output shaft and the female on the bit and you do not have the option to rotate the bit on the shaft to help work the grit out and get it on far enough to get the pin in.
I have the round style where there is no hex to turn the bit, all the torque must be held by the 7/8" pin on each side of the bit. It takes alot to shear a 7/8 pin in 2 places at once. So unless you want some very large bits, and use it in tough conditions, I'd stay with the round. In these parts it is more common also. Maybe check with any local rental center to see what they use just incase you need to rent.
Ken
I will have to call and see what styles of bits the rental places keep.Definatly a good idea.
 

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