742 No Pressure for Front Aux

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craigb93

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Nov 9, 2010
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742 No Pressure At front Aux 5018 M 150449


Connected my bushog and activated Rt stick. I get fluid flow in both directions as evidenced by the lines jumping with either direction of the stick on. But no pressure to turn the bushog. Must have a by-pass problem somewhere. Drive, lift & tilt functions are all good. Fluid is full and clean. Main filter has <4 HOURS. Machine made a noise when I first started it that sounded like flow through a relief valve. Lasted about 20 seconds then went away. It was loud but faded as the machine was warming up at a bit above idle.
The Manual doesn't give any detail about the aux circuit. Could this be the float detent is engaged? Manual does not describe that either.
I could use a little help.
-Dick
 
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craigb93

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Nov 9, 2010
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I do. Log splitter. Both worked fine last year. Although the splitter seemed to slow down near the end of the year. Going to take both of them off and see if the float detent is the culprit.
Then I may have to get help w/ the control block.
 

oiu789

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Dec 23, 2017
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Check the disconnects. I had one come apart inside and would not allow flow.
 
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craigb93

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I can see the lines surge in both directions such that there has to be flow, just no/ not enough pressure. Both couplers are fairly new.
 

brdgbldr

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My experience is mostly Bobcat. They usually have the float on the lift arms which is engaged by pressing down hard with the heal of your foot on the lift foot pedal.

The other detent is for the auxiliaries. This is engaged by moving the auxiliary lever (right lever) all the way to the right. This keeps the auxiliaries open to run things like mowers.

Other machines are normally similar in some fashion or another.
 
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craigb93

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My experience is mostly Bobcat. They usually have the float on the lift arms which is engaged by pressing down hard with the heal of your foot on the lift foot pedal.

The other detent is for the auxiliaries. This is engaged by moving the auxiliary lever (right lever) all the way to the right. This keeps the auxiliaries open to run things like mowers.

Other machines are normally similar in some fashion or another.
Actually the Float Detent in engaged by pressing the right Foot Pedal all the way down with Toe of the pedal. When the cylinder hits overload at full extension the detent holds the relief valve by-pass loop open. Pressing the heel of the Rt pedal returns the pressure control to the relief valve when it reaches full extraction of the tilt cylinder.
I never use the float feature as it means, just as it did this time, detaching the bush hog to be able to stroke the cylinder back to full retraction. Have not tried to see whether a lighter attachment such as forks or bucket will allow reset while attached. What do I know.

Auxiliaries Detent works as you describe.
 

brdgbldr

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My experience is mostly Bobcat. They usually have the float on the lift arms which is engaged by pressing down hard with the heal of your foot on the lift foot pedal.

The other detent is for the auxiliaries. This is engaged by moving the auxiliary lever (right lever) all the way to the right. This keeps the auxiliaries open to run things like mowers.

Other machines are normally similar in some fashion or another.
My screw up above, the float is the left pedal with the toe pressed down. Been a while since I've used that machine with the float. Pressing the heal stops the float.
 

Dave1234

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Apr 21, 2023
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I have a different float question--I just got a 742B, and am working through its problems so It will be usable this winter. I just tried float, which requires really slamming the foot pedal down to engage the detent, but does engage, and the engine isn't straining against a completely retracted cylinder, so I think I an in float position, but right now the machine is sitting there with its front wheels in the air. I would have thought that in float it would have rested its wheels on the ground with nothing but the weight of the lift arms pushing down--Can anyone tell me if my machine is acting right?
 

brdgbldr

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I have a different float question--I just got a 742B, and am working through its problems so It will be usable this winter. I just tried float, which requires really slamming the foot pedal down to engage the detent, but does engage, and the engine isn't straining against a completely retracted cylinder, so I think I an in float position, but right now the machine is sitting there with its front wheels in the air. I would have thought that in float it would have rested its wheels on the ground with nothing but the weight of the lift arms pushing down--Can anyone tell me if my machine is acting right?
If your front wheels are off the ground the float is not working.

Try this….. with the bucket curled up all the way so nothing is touching the ground, press the front of the lift peddle with your toes until the detent engages (The peddle should stick in this position). Take your foot off of the lift peddle and then curl the bucket down. Once the bucket starts hitting the ground the lift arms should start being pushed up by the bucket.

If your front wheels come off the ground your float is not engaged or not working.
 

Dave1234

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Apr 21, 2023
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@brdgbldrThank you for your suggestions--I tried engaging float with the arms in the air as you suggested, and it seems to work fine. I can't imagine how long it would have taken me to stumble on that on my own. Thank you.
 
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