Oil

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OldMachinist

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I don't want to open a whole new can of worms here but I have to add some new info I found.
There is a apparently a difference hydraulic oil and hydrostatic fluid. The Bobcat branded oil is listed as hydraulic/hydrostatic transmission fluid (pn 69031118)on the pail. I went out and looked at my other jugs of hydraulic oil I have and they say do not use in hydrostatic systems. My hydrostatic drive mower says do not use hydraulic oil use only hydrostatic transmission fluid.
 

Tazza

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Dec 7, 2004
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That's interesting but, I sure would like to know the particulars.
My local diesel shop has a reference book to tell them what oil is suitable for what machine. I think it only had a 743 on there and it was 10 grade oil. I will try and get more info though.
 

pondfishr

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Oct 11, 2005
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My local diesel shop has a reference book to tell them what oil is suitable for what machine. I think it only had a 743 on there and it was 10 grade oil. I will try and get more info though.
My dealer told me a couple of years ago to only use Bobcat Hydraulic Fluid. I do understand that he sells that product but he implicated that other types of hydro fluid could damage my machine. I have 5 gallons on Kubota hydro fluid here that I have not used in my Bobcat due to the fact I don't want to create more issues than I already have.
 

mllud

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Jun 29, 2007
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My dealer told me a couple of years ago to only use Bobcat Hydraulic Fluid. I do understand that he sells that product but he implicated that other types of hydro fluid could damage my machine. I have 5 gallons on Kubota hydro fluid here that I have not used in my Bobcat due to the fact I don't want to create more issues than I already have.
I have always used the recomended fluids . Can the mechanics of the pumps valves and cylinders be so different or do the different solvents or addatives react to the seals,o-rings that different manufactures use.I can understand there being a difference between hydrostatic and hydraulic fluids, They are completly different types of pumps. Although there is a gear pump being used in line with hydrostatic pumps. My machine recomends 10W30 oil. It has over 3000 hours and is strong.Its always best to use recomended fluid ,but it looks like they are protecting their interest in selling the fluids. Mike
 

Bandit1047

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Jan 13, 2008
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117
My dealer told me a couple of years ago to only use Bobcat Hydraulic Fluid. I do understand that he sells that product but he implicated that other types of hydro fluid could damage my machine. I have 5 gallons on Kubota hydro fluid here that I have not used in my Bobcat due to the fact I don't want to create more issues than I already have.
I learned long ago that lubricants are JOB SPECIFIC. and if I deviate from the manufacturers recomended lubricant I get an O.K. in writing from the manufacturer (not the dealer) that it is O.K. to change to a specific lubricant. They will e-mail or fax you a sheet with recomended and alternative lubricants or give you an ISO number (VG46). Lubricants have hundreds of addatives to achieve specific results. They can contain; high pressure additives, friction modifiers, tachifiers, sulfers, cleaners and who knows what else. Some of these items will work in a machine because it has certain seals that are not affected where another machine's seals will be eaten away. Some systems need the specific additive to fill a specific need in that system. Since we are on this subject, filters also need to be correct. I had a $400,000. CNC Lathe that needed a new spindle oil filter. The supplier sent a smaller micro than the one called for. Lucky I checked the specs right after it was installed. I removed the new filter and found a jelly subsance around the filter. It had filtered out the paraffin, a critical lubricant. Equipment is to expensive to be careless with filters and fluids! Joe
 

jklingel

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Feb 8, 2008
Messages
220
I learned long ago that lubricants are JOB SPECIFIC. and if I deviate from the manufacturers recomended lubricant I get an O.K. in writing from the manufacturer (not the dealer) that it is O.K. to change to a specific lubricant. They will e-mail or fax you a sheet with recomended and alternative lubricants or give you an ISO number (VG46). Lubricants have hundreds of addatives to achieve specific results. They can contain; high pressure additives, friction modifiers, tachifiers, sulfers, cleaners and who knows what else. Some of these items will work in a machine because it has certain seals that are not affected where another machine's seals will be eaten away. Some systems need the specific additive to fill a specific need in that system. Since we are on this subject, filters also need to be correct. I had a $400,000. CNC Lathe that needed a new spindle oil filter. The supplier sent a smaller micro than the one called for. Lucky I checked the specs right after it was installed. I removed the new filter and found a jelly subsance around the filter. It had filtered out the paraffin, a critical lubricant. Equipment is to expensive to be careless with filters and fluids! Joe
That "wrong oil filter" story was an eye-opener. Thanks for sharing it. Things are just getting to technically specific any more, one maybe better do just what you said. Go to the manufacturer and get it in writing. j
 

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