need help chaining to trailer

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edwardo

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
15
HI, newbee here,I just picked up a s150 and need some advice on attaching it to a trailer.could somebody please post a picture?
 

jmatt20

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2005
Messages
126
in CA. you need a least 4 seperate chains or straps and at least one of them must go to the boom to keep it from lifting somehow. i have a s220 and it is on a trailer with my 331 excavator. i use a combination of chains and straps ,on the 220 in the back near the boom cylinder there is a hole in the case to grease the rear cylinder piviot ,i put a strap hook in there on each side and go back to a d ring on the trailer. in the front on the boom above the bucket there are two loops welded on the boom ,i hook a chain to each one of these and go foreward to d rings on the trailer, as they are hooked to the boom that handles the boom tiedown requirement. the straps are from home depot and cost about 14$ and are dot approved 10000lb bust strength and 3300lb working limit. make sure your chains are system 7 (stamped on the chain every 2 ft or so) and the rachet binders are the preferred binder but not required you can use the lever type. i set my chains first and then use the rachets on the straps to put tension on the system, works great ,the bobcat never moves. if you are not in CA. check with your local chp office,no matter what the law says, it is the way the officer on the road interperets the law that decides if you get the ticket or not., p.s. the 4 seperate tie downs means you can not run a chain from one side of the machine thru the d ring accross the trailer thru the d ring on that side and then back to the machine ,that would be one tie down some guys not wanting to cut thier chain run it accross the trailer and use a binder on each side to form two loops ,leaving the part accross the trailer loose and not part of the tie down system that would seem to comply with the rule but your cop may say that is all one chain so it's one tie down.
 

edwardo

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
15
in CA. you need a least 4 seperate chains or straps and at least one of them must go to the boom to keep it from lifting somehow. i have a s220 and it is on a trailer with my 331 excavator. i use a combination of chains and straps ,on the 220 in the back near the boom cylinder there is a hole in the case to grease the rear cylinder piviot ,i put a strap hook in there on each side and go back to a d ring on the trailer. in the front on the boom above the bucket there are two loops welded on the boom ,i hook a chain to each one of these and go foreward to d rings on the trailer, as they are hooked to the boom that handles the boom tiedown requirement. the straps are from home depot and cost about 14$ and are dot approved 10000lb bust strength and 3300lb working limit. make sure your chains are system 7 (stamped on the chain every 2 ft or so) and the rachet binders are the preferred binder but not required you can use the lever type. i set my chains first and then use the rachets on the straps to put tension on the system, works great ,the bobcat never moves. if you are not in CA. check with your local chp office,no matter what the law says, it is the way the officer on the road interperets the law that decides if you get the ticket or not., p.s. the 4 seperate tie downs means you can not run a chain from one side of the machine thru the d ring accross the trailer thru the d ring on that side and then back to the machine ,that would be one tie down some guys not wanting to cut thier chain run it accross the trailer and use a binder on each side to form two loops ,leaving the part accross the trailer loose and not part of the tie down system that would seem to comply with the rule but your cop may say that is all one chain so it's one tie down.
Thanks for your help.Does anyone know the canadian laws regarding this?
 

bobcat_ron

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
334
Thanks for your help.Does anyone know the canadian laws regarding this?
I can help you with that, I took an Air brake course for Class 1 and part of it was Load Security. You will need 1 tie down point on the load (whatever the load may be) every 1.4 meters, on my T190, it works out to be the rear tie down under the red engine cover (tail gate whatever) and the tie down anchors on the loader. You can get away with 1 long chain and a single tie binder on the rear, as long as the chain is 5/16" thick or better, and the same on the front if you go through the loader and around the bucket cylinders or use the tie down loop in the middle of the belly pan, whatever method you use will work fine. the tie binders can be attached to the trailer tie down ralis with the chain attached to the load or the other way around, the CVSE (Commercial Vehicle Saftey Enforcement AKA the dreaded D.O.T.) doesn't care, as long as it is tight and no wiggle or bouncing around will make them shake. Second, make sure the tie binders are tight using a pipe for leverage and secure the handles with wires or bungee cords. Now this is the part where everyone get nailed big time on......I hope you have a Class 1 or 3 license, if so ignore this, if you don't along with others who read this, here goes........with a standard Class 5 license, you may pull a tralier of any length, of any axle combination WITHOUT air brakes, the weight of the TRAILER AND LOAD CARRIED MUST NOT EXCEED 4600 kgs or 10,000 lbs give or take, if you are over by 100 kilos, you will be asked to remove weight from the trailer and or load, if you cannot, you will be asked to drop the trailer and you are screwed. I got nailed big time with my trailer 2 years ago by the CVSE, I had to drop everything and get it towed, all because I was over by 200 kilos and I couldn't remove the excess weight. Lastly, make sure you have the proper registration regarding the trailer and your inspection decals are up to date, even if you are a casual user of the trailer and you will only haul it around 1 or 2 times a month, all it takes is 1 accident and it all goes to hell....fast.
 

sterlclan

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2004
Messages
528
I can help you with that, I took an Air brake course for Class 1 and part of it was Load Security. You will need 1 tie down point on the load (whatever the load may be) every 1.4 meters, on my T190, it works out to be the rear tie down under the red engine cover (tail gate whatever) and the tie down anchors on the loader. You can get away with 1 long chain and a single tie binder on the rear, as long as the chain is 5/16" thick or better, and the same on the front if you go through the loader and around the bucket cylinders or use the tie down loop in the middle of the belly pan, whatever method you use will work fine. the tie binders can be attached to the trailer tie down ralis with the chain attached to the load or the other way around, the CVSE (Commercial Vehicle Saftey Enforcement AKA the dreaded D.O.T.) doesn't care, as long as it is tight and no wiggle or bouncing around will make them shake. Second, make sure the tie binders are tight using a pipe for leverage and secure the handles with wires or bungee cords. Now this is the part where everyone get nailed big time on......I hope you have a Class 1 or 3 license, if so ignore this, if you don't along with others who read this, here goes........with a standard Class 5 license, you may pull a tralier of any length, of any axle combination WITHOUT air brakes, the weight of the TRAILER AND LOAD CARRIED MUST NOT EXCEED 4600 kgs or 10,000 lbs give or take, if you are over by 100 kilos, you will be asked to remove weight from the trailer and or load, if you cannot, you will be asked to drop the trailer and you are screwed. I got nailed big time with my trailer 2 years ago by the CVSE, I had to drop everything and get it towed, all because I was over by 200 kilos and I couldn't remove the excess weight. Lastly, make sure you have the proper registration regarding the trailer and your inspection decals are up to date, even if you are a casual user of the trailer and you will only haul it around 1 or 2 times a month, all it takes is 1 accident and it all goes to hell....fast.
personally I prefer to use 4 chains with binders and I cross the rear ones so the machine cant slide/bounce sideways also pull the chains away from the machine IE rear to rear of trailer front to front of trailer if the chains go straight the machine ends to slid fore and aft good luck .Jeff
 

edwardo

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
15
personally I prefer to use 4 chains with binders and I cross the rear ones so the machine cant slide/bounce sideways also pull the chains away from the machine IE rear to rear of trailer front to front of trailer if the chains go straight the machine ends to slid fore and aft good luck .Jeff
thanks for the help guys.
 

pelpel

Active member
Joined
Jan 28, 2007
Messages
43
Greetings, here in BC I went to h**l and back getting it right as the Insurance Co (ICBC) and Motor Vehicle Branch (kind of like DOT) do not talk to each other as to what is needed. Your tow vehicle has to be a vehicle with Truck plates. I had a Chev Suburban which could legally tow 10,000 lbs, but is a SUV. SUV's can only legally tow a commercial trailer up to 3,500 lbs. only. Now I use a Chev 1 ton Crew Cab Dually, legal for 10,000 lbs. on a Weight bearing hitch (not weight distributing), I had to get a new receiver hitch for that. My insured GCWR is 17,000 lbs. which costs extra for insurance. The vehicle scales in BC require you to go the the scales anytime you have a truck with more then 5,500 kg of GVW (truck & trailer combined licenced weight). This now means if my wife takes the kids shopping, or I drive to Disney Land, I get to go to every scale in north america. Empty or full, business or pleasure use. To sum it up, do you homework, go to the folks at the scale, be sure you are licenced correct or they will have your behind for lunch, not to mention if you get into an accident with incorrect insurance
 

bobcat_ron

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
334
Greetings, here in BC I went to h**l and back getting it right as the Insurance Co (ICBC) and Motor Vehicle Branch (kind of like DOT) do not talk to each other as to what is needed. Your tow vehicle has to be a vehicle with Truck plates. I had a Chev Suburban which could legally tow 10,000 lbs, but is a SUV. SUV's can only legally tow a commercial trailer up to 3,500 lbs. only. Now I use a Chev 1 ton Crew Cab Dually, legal for 10,000 lbs. on a Weight bearing hitch (not weight distributing), I had to get a new receiver hitch for that. My insured GCWR is 17,000 lbs. which costs extra for insurance. The vehicle scales in BC require you to go the the scales anytime you have a truck with more then 5,500 kg of GVW (truck & trailer combined licenced weight). This now means if my wife takes the kids shopping, or I drive to Disney Land, I get to go to every scale in north america. Empty or full, business or pleasure use. To sum it up, do you homework, go to the folks at the scale, be sure you are licenced correct or they will have your behind for lunch, not to mention if you get into an accident with incorrect insurance
Holy crap! That I didn't learn! ICBC and MVB and the CVSE are the 3 biggest a**holes out there for "The Man" owned business offices, and the employees are real jacka**es to deal with. I always make sure I take a leisurely detour around the scales with my truck even empty.
 

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
Holy crap! That I didn't learn! ICBC and MVB and the CVSE are the 3 biggest a**holes out there for "The Man" owned business offices, and the employees are real jacka**es to deal with. I always make sure I take a leisurely detour around the scales with my truck even empty.
Ontario is no better, if your commercial pickup is licenced for or weights over 4500 kg 10000 lbs you might as well drive a semi, same amount of decals, licence and paperwork, logbooks, circle checks , smog test, hours of service all that bs appplies. And there is no such thing as personal use of a commercial pickup that has had any modifications to the factoy box, flat deck etc, regardless of weather your empty or loaded if its licenced over 4500kg.
If you can stay under 4500, you can tow up to another 2600 kg / 6600 lbs gross on a trailer with minimal hassel, provided you don't licence for over 4500. But if either vehicle goes over those numbers some a hole will be pulling you over for roadside safetys, load security checks, hours of service records and I have yet to meet a MTO cop that is not a jacka** They love to waste a hour of you time then stick you with a 400 to 800 or more dollar fine.
I got put on the portables 2 years ago, weight 4800kg, so they fined me 390.00 for not having a circle check filled out to show them, even though the truck was fine mechanically, which is really a bunch of bullsh*t because I could have had 2300kg more if it was on a trailer and been legal.
Believe me I have a new found hatred for the ontario government and the gustopple they hire to stick it to the working man.
Ken
 

bobcat_ron

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
334
Ontario is no better, if your commercial pickup is licenced for or weights over 4500 kg 10000 lbs you might as well drive a semi, same amount of decals, licence and paperwork, logbooks, circle checks , smog test, hours of service all that bs appplies. And there is no such thing as personal use of a commercial pickup that has had any modifications to the factoy box, flat deck etc, regardless of weather your empty or loaded if its licenced over 4500kg.
If you can stay under 4500, you can tow up to another 2600 kg / 6600 lbs gross on a trailer with minimal hassel, provided you don't licence for over 4500. But if either vehicle goes over those numbers some a hole will be pulling you over for roadside safetys, load security checks, hours of service records and I have yet to meet a MTO cop that is not a jacka** They love to waste a hour of you time then stick you with a 400 to 800 or more dollar fine.
I got put on the portables 2 years ago, weight 4800kg, so they fined me 390.00 for not having a circle check filled out to show them, even though the truck was fine mechanically, which is really a bunch of bullsh*t because I could have had 2300kg more if it was on a trailer and been legal.
Believe me I have a new found hatred for the ontario government and the gustopple they hire to stick it to the working man.
Ken
Wow, I alsway thought us West Coaster got bent over, OPP must have a huge tub of Vaseline!!
 
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