How to carry loaded bucket on steep grade????

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864wood

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Joined
Mar 27, 2004
Messages
87
Had a jod thursday where excavator left some extra dirt in foundation because his machine was too big to remove last little bit. Hence I come into picture,..... The site is very cramped and the only place to put the spoils is in the front of the property. It was originally dug with a Cat 963B track loader. He had a ramp into hole and the spoil mound coming out of the hole that was 25' tall not including 10' down into foundation. I must also add that the spoils mound is very narrow at he top. I have been told that the proper way to bring a fully loaded bobcat out of the hole is ass first, turn dump spoils, turn again and drive nose first back into hole. I must add that the initial drive into hole was to say the least very interesting! Has something to do with the comfort factor. I loaded bucket and drove the machine straight up incline, dumped spoils at the top and backed back down. No fuss, no muss, however is this wrong? Feels better with gravity at your back.
 

500K_773

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Joined
Mar 5, 2004
Messages
342
864wood, I think as a rule skid steer loaders are heavy in the rear which allows them to lift such large amounts in relation to their size. The tires on skid steers create a pivot point which is probably much different than your machine with tracks. It seems that track machines are much more stable than wheeled machines because of the larger footprint. I believe your tracks is what allows you to "go against the rule" I know with tires, I have much more traction going in reverse up hills, even with a load in the bucket. Your tracks probably offer nearly the same amount of traction in either direction. I always back up steep grades and drive down face first. This is also what the owner's manual recommends. If the ramp gets too steep or soft, I can also push myself out backwards with the bucket.
 

Tigerotor77W

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Joined
Apr 29, 2004
Messages
268
864wood, I think as a rule skid steer loaders are heavy in the rear which allows them to lift such large amounts in relation to their size. The tires on skid steers create a pivot point which is probably much different than your machine with tracks. It seems that track machines are much more stable than wheeled machines because of the larger footprint. I believe your tracks is what allows you to "go against the rule" I know with tires, I have much more traction going in reverse up hills, even with a load in the bucket. Your tracks probably offer nearly the same amount of traction in either direction. I always back up steep grades and drive down face first. This is also what the owner's manual recommends. If the ramp gets too steep or soft, I can also push myself out backwards with the bucket.
What 773 said is true. Generally, heavy end up the grade. However, depending on the size of your bucket, material in the bucket, and amount of material in the bucket, especially on a tracked machine, the front may be heavier. In this case, you'd want bucket end first. (Whichever end is heavier.) If you get to the top, however, and decide to lift and dump while still ON the incline (eg you're looking straight ahead but see sky, not Earth), you may tip over backwards if you empty your bucket and lift high enough. Being on a track machine, you have a little more leeway because more weight is up front, but be care... too steep an incline and you'll need the ROPS. Xing
 

864wood

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 27, 2004
Messages
87
What 773 said is true. Generally, heavy end up the grade. However, depending on the size of your bucket, material in the bucket, and amount of material in the bucket, especially on a tracked machine, the front may be heavier. In this case, you'd want bucket end first. (Whichever end is heavier.) If you get to the top, however, and decide to lift and dump while still ON the incline (eg you're looking straight ahead but see sky, not Earth), you may tip over backwards if you empty your bucket and lift high enough. Being on a track machine, you have a little more leeway because more weight is up front, but be care... too steep an incline and you'll need the ROPS. Xing
Clarification of my equipment might be in order. The set up is as follows; 864G, 18" soliddeal charlie brown pattern tracks(really aggressive) and an 84" combo bucket. While driving down the incline the machine felt nose heavy, however drining up the incline empty intially, it felt fine. This may be because the combo bucket is twice as heavy as a regular construction bucket. Another advantage to the combo that I used in this case, is that when I reached the top I just opened the combo and used the dozer to drive the spoiles at the top. So I did not haver to raise bucket at any time, it always stayed low. Then backing down was a cinch because I had my worn tracks in the dirt that you coud feel with the machine as you went back down. I must also add that everybody I have talked to has said my methods are unorthodox.
 

Tigerotor77W

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2004
Messages
268
Clarification of my equipment might be in order. The set up is as follows; 864G, 18" soliddeal charlie brown pattern tracks(really aggressive) and an 84" combo bucket. While driving down the incline the machine felt nose heavy, however drining up the incline empty intially, it felt fine. This may be because the combo bucket is twice as heavy as a regular construction bucket. Another advantage to the combo that I used in this case, is that when I reached the top I just opened the combo and used the dozer to drive the spoiles at the top. So I did not haver to raise bucket at any time, it always stayed low. Then backing down was a cinch because I had my worn tracks in the dirt that you coud feel with the machine as you went back down. I must also add that everybody I have talked to has said my methods are unorthodox.
Eh... everyone's gotta differentiate themselves somehow; might as well do some crazy earthmoving that doesn't seem possible. :) lol
 
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