Eel River Tracks

Help Support SkidSteer Forum:

Bandit1047

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Messages
117
Anyone out there running Eel River Chain link tracks? I need to know if they are any good? As much info as you can provide would be appreciated. Also need to know if I should run tire pressure high or low inside tracks. I have 14.5 X 17 Extreme duty tires that are very hard rubber. Any other track manufacturers info that make good tracks for these big tires would also be appreciated! Joe
 

Butters

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 23, 2007
Messages
72
I just pulled up a picture, I don't know but they look like a low end track. Depending on the costs of course.

http://www.skidtracks.com/trax-wishboneclamp.php
I bought a set of them last year to run on my 751 to clean out a pond. They worked great, but I only put about 25 hours on them and set them aside.
 

jklingel

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 8, 2008
Messages
220
I bought a set of them last year to run on my 751 to clean out a pond. They worked great, but I only put about 25 hours on them and set them aside.
Interesting. They look a lot like these: http://www.tractiontracks.com/. I have had several "conversations" with the folks that make the TractionTracks, and they assure me that theirs will last a good 1000 hrs or more. Their test pair has 700 hrs on it and shows no sign of fatigue. I wonder what grade chain Eel uses, etc. By the time all was said and done, I was looking at about $2200 for the TT delivered, vs $3800 for the JD tracks (made by Grouser) in town. I sure like the thought of manhandling these chain tracks vs the plate and pin types, but I also wonder about the longevity. There were several good replies to a recent posting about tracks, too. You may want to check it out if you haven't already. j
 

mllud

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 29, 2007
Messages
635
Interesting. They look a lot like these: http://www.tractiontracks.com/. I have had several "conversations" with the folks that make the TractionTracks, and they assure me that theirs will last a good 1000 hrs or more. Their test pair has 700 hrs on it and shows no sign of fatigue. I wonder what grade chain Eel uses, etc. By the time all was said and done, I was looking at about $2200 for the TT delivered, vs $3800 for the JD tracks (made by Grouser) in town. I sure like the thought of manhandling these chain tracks vs the plate and pin types, but I also wonder about the longevity. There were several good replies to a recent posting about tracks, too. You may want to check it out if you haven't already. j
I have watched their video and I believe at the you would get your moneys worth. If you got 1000 hours and threw them in the scrap pile you got your moneys worth.If my loader hadnt came with loegering I would have bought the traction tracks. Mike
 

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
Interesting. They look a lot like these: http://www.tractiontracks.com/. I have had several "conversations" with the folks that make the TractionTracks, and they assure me that theirs will last a good 1000 hrs or more. Their test pair has 700 hrs on it and shows no sign of fatigue. I wonder what grade chain Eel uses, etc. By the time all was said and done, I was looking at about $2200 for the TT delivered, vs $3800 for the JD tracks (made by Grouser) in town. I sure like the thought of manhandling these chain tracks vs the plate and pin types, but I also wonder about the longevity. There were several good replies to a recent posting about tracks, too. You may want to check it out if you haven't already. j
John
Not to be a skeptic here but I would like to see some close up photos of the chains where they pivot as they go around the tire. I'm sure with 700 hours there would have to be some wear. The amount would factor largely on where and when the tracks were used. In snow they would last a long time and in beach sand the pivot wear would be much greater. The pads could alway be built up if needed, so that would concern me less. My experience with Loeguring and Tracks Plus is that somewhere between 50 and 100 hours of operation, you will need to shorten the track, as the pivots continually wear..
I sold a set of traction tracks to a fellow with a 553 because we did not have any that small, I still had them built with the 7/16 chain. I have not heard from him lately but would assume they are still going on that small machine. He was a farmer and cowsh!t would be easy on the pivot points too.
There have been those who laugh at them and others that are very happy someone builds a inexpensive product. There is no doubt they work. And it depends alot on how they are used. As ASV put it to me about there rubber track life, "if your application is hard on tires, you will be hard on tracks to"
If I was getting a set of chain tracks for a machine that large, I'd be going as heavy duty as possible. Another thing with chains is you can't adjust the chain in 1" increments. (perhaps you could find a couple different length shackles) so it may be harder to keep the the ideal tension. Too loose and your tires spin inside them and to tight is tough on bearings and the track pivots. Some people vary there tire pressure and that makes a difference with most tires.
The other thing to me is being freight is a large portion or the cost being your in AK, I would lean towards something that would last well. But of course the purchase has to fit you budget and needs, not mine.
Have a great day
Ken
 

Land-Tech

Well-known member
Joined
May 13, 2008
Messages
160
John
Not to be a skeptic here but I would like to see some close up photos of the chains where they pivot as they go around the tire. I'm sure with 700 hours there would have to be some wear. The amount would factor largely on where and when the tracks were used. In snow they would last a long time and in beach sand the pivot wear would be much greater. The pads could alway be built up if needed, so that would concern me less. My experience with Loeguring and Tracks Plus is that somewhere between 50 and 100 hours of operation, you will need to shorten the track, as the pivots continually wear..
I sold a set of traction tracks to a fellow with a 553 because we did not have any that small, I still had them built with the 7/16 chain. I have not heard from him lately but would assume they are still going on that small machine. He was a farmer and cowsh!t would be easy on the pivot points too.
There have been those who laugh at them and others that are very happy someone builds a inexpensive product. There is no doubt they work. And it depends alot on how they are used. As ASV put it to me about there rubber track life, "if your application is hard on tires, you will be hard on tracks to"
If I was getting a set of chain tracks for a machine that large, I'd be going as heavy duty as possible. Another thing with chains is you can't adjust the chain in 1" increments. (perhaps you could find a couple different length shackles) so it may be harder to keep the the ideal tension. Too loose and your tires spin inside them and to tight is tough on bearings and the track pivots. Some people vary there tire pressure and that makes a difference with most tires.
The other thing to me is being freight is a large portion or the cost being your in AK, I would lean towards something that would last well. But of course the purchase has to fit you budget and needs, not mine.
Have a great day
Ken
I have run Grouser tracks for over ten years and find them to be well worth the cost. The wear factor is important. They have very large replaceable bushings that connect thre pads but the bolts wear way before bushing does . the new pair I have has a bar on the inside pad that is designed to catch the lugs on your tire. the first pair I had wore the actual grousers down flat but I bought some square stock. cut it to length and welded on. Kind of a hassle but I doubled the hours to about 4000 hrs.You can order hardened pads. It's my opinion the the tracks are easier on the tires as far as wear is concerned. They are adjustable.at one inch increments. I run them loose and have to get in some pretty greasy muck to get them to spin. With a lighter machine you can run on pavment if its cool..they have beveled grousers so you can spin without the edges digging in.
Flat tires are a hassle but even with the bead broke ,you can walk it some where it is easy to change. There are some tricks to putting them on but nothing to hard. They have bolt holes for rubber pads but I have never used them. They clean out real good in mucky clay. The ground that I work in has a lot of sharp rock so rubber just would not work for me, they would get sliced sooner or later. Ken has all the points correct including freight, I live in Ak.
I really want a set of the new Loegering VTS but that will be down the road. you get much more bang for your buck with OTT. Scott
 

Land-Tech

Well-known member
Joined
May 13, 2008
Messages
160
I have run Grouser tracks for over ten years and find them to be well worth the cost. The wear factor is important. They have very large replaceable bushings that connect thre pads but the bolts wear way before bushing does . the new pair I have has a bar on the inside pad that is designed to catch the lugs on your tire. the first pair I had wore the actual grousers down flat but I bought some square stock. cut it to length and welded on. Kind of a hassle but I doubled the hours to about 4000 hrs.You can order hardened pads. It's my opinion the the tracks are easier on the tires as far as wear is concerned. They are adjustable.at one inch increments. I run them loose and have to get in some pretty greasy muck to get them to spin. With a lighter machine you can run on pavment if its cool..they have beveled grousers so you can spin without the edges digging in.
Flat tires are a hassle but even with the bead broke ,you can walk it some where it is easy to change. There are some tricks to putting them on but nothing to hard. They have bolt holes for rubber pads but I have never used them. They clean out real good in mucky clay. The ground that I work in has a lot of sharp rock so rubber just would not work for me, they would get sliced sooner or later. Ken has all the points correct including freight, I live in Ak.
I really want a set of the new Loegering VTS but that will be down the road. you get much more bang for your buck with OTT. Scott
P2080002Large.jpg image by LANDTEKK
This shows a new pad and the size of the bushing in the link.scott
 

mllud

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 29, 2007
Messages
635
This shows a new pad and the size of the bushing in the link.scott
I would only buy a less expensive track based on what I use my machine for,that is farm use. If I were working for hire there would be a lot more to consider. You cant get out on a for hire and have things breaking. If the life of the track is 1000. your probably going to be doing repairs to them at 7or 800 hours. I think I may only use my loader 200 hours a year. Mike
 
OP
OP
B

Bandit1047

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Messages
117
I would only buy a less expensive track based on what I use my machine for,that is farm use. If I were working for hire there would be a lot more to consider. You cant get out on a for hire and have things breaking. If the life of the track is 1000. your probably going to be doing repairs to them at 7or 800 hours. I think I may only use my loader 200 hours a year. Mike
I appreciate all the input. How are the Prowler or McClaren steel tracks, anyone using them on a big machine? Joe
 

jklingel

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 8, 2008
Messages
220
I appreciate all the input. How are the Prowler or McClaren steel tracks, anyone using them on a big machine? Joe
Ken/Landtek: I see your points. Good to get some feedback on the Grousers, too. I don't think there is any question about the longevity of the "real" tracks being better, but 4000 hrs is a LOT better, I would guess. Yes, the freight is always a key factor. Once I got the info, I realized that for $1600 more I could have tracks that will really work, and not have to pay for another set AND ship it up. (I assume that real tracks will last twice as long as chain tracks; maybe more?) So, in the long haul, if I need tracks I will probably get the real kind, either from "some guy in Canada" or my local dealer, whoever has a fire sale first. Thanks all for the info for the rest of us.
 

Latest posts

Top