When did all quick attach plates become universal?

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Mr Jimi

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Joined
Jan 30, 2006
Messages
103
As some of you know I am making some various attachments for my 1991 Case 1845C and I would like them to fit Bobcats etc? They all have 2 sets of holes and only use one set? I don't want to make these to fit my Case and get a different machine and have to cut another hole to make it fit another one, I would like to do this one time, right.
Jim
 

bobbie-g

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Joined
Mar 15, 2004
Messages
574
Jim --- My only data points are a 1995 751C Bobcat and a 743 Bobcat (year unknown, probably about 1993 or so). Both have the same pin arrangement, with the center of the pins right at 5 1/4 inches in from either edge of the attachment plate. When I build an attachment plate, I make the lower flange plates with holes starting at 4 1/4 inches in from the edges, 2 1/2 inches wide, and stopping at 6 3/4 inches in from the edges. The large attachment plate is about 44 5/8 inch wide, and the slop comes out to about a quarter of an inch sied-to-side when put it on my Bobcat. The hole size above seems to accommodate the pins OK, wherever the attachment ends up on the Bobcat. I could probably make the attachment 44 1/2 inches wide, but I'd sure hate to find I'd made one that was too narrow to fit on the next guy's skid steer, so I just put up with the 1/4 inch slop and leave the lower flange plate holes large enough to handle it. By the way, I make the plates with the holes in them by using three pieces of steel stock, each from 1/4 inch thick by 1 1/2 inch wide strap. One piece is 12 inches long, one is 4 1/4 inches long, and the other is 5 1/4 inches long. Weld them together and I end up with a hole right where it needs to be. I hang the large plate on the Bobcat, then (after disconnecting the battery, don't wanna blow out the BICS computer!) tack weld the flanges with holes in place so as to get the right angle to match the Bobcat quick-tach. Measuring angles and distances to get the flanges/holes correct is a bit beyond me, but the method above so far takes no thought and works perfectly every time with a nice tight fit. In some cases, I've had to position the flanges/holes out about a 1/16 inch from the backing plate to ensure the pins don't bind. Also, I found if I added the flanges/holes as I described above, then did more welding on the large plate, it would warp just a bit. Then the top parts of the quick-tach plates on the Bobcat would no longer nest well inside the upper flange on the attachment plate, and I had to remove some metal on the bottom flange/hole plates so the pins would not bind. Hope this makes sense. --- Bob
 

skidsteer.ca

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Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
Jim --- My only data points are a 1995 751C Bobcat and a 743 Bobcat (year unknown, probably about 1993 or so). Both have the same pin arrangement, with the center of the pins right at 5 1/4 inches in from either edge of the attachment plate. When I build an attachment plate, I make the lower flange plates with holes starting at 4 1/4 inches in from the edges, 2 1/2 inches wide, and stopping at 6 3/4 inches in from the edges. The large attachment plate is about 44 5/8 inch wide, and the slop comes out to about a quarter of an inch sied-to-side when put it on my Bobcat. The hole size above seems to accommodate the pins OK, wherever the attachment ends up on the Bobcat. I could probably make the attachment 44 1/2 inches wide, but I'd sure hate to find I'd made one that was too narrow to fit on the next guy's skid steer, so I just put up with the 1/4 inch slop and leave the lower flange plate holes large enough to handle it. By the way, I make the plates with the holes in them by using three pieces of steel stock, each from 1/4 inch thick by 1 1/2 inch wide strap. One piece is 12 inches long, one is 4 1/4 inches long, and the other is 5 1/4 inches long. Weld them together and I end up with a hole right where it needs to be. I hang the large plate on the Bobcat, then (after disconnecting the battery, don't wanna blow out the BICS computer!) tack weld the flanges with holes in place so as to get the right angle to match the Bobcat quick-tach. Measuring angles and distances to get the flanges/holes correct is a bit beyond me, but the method above so far takes no thought and works perfectly every time with a nice tight fit. In some cases, I've had to position the flanges/holes out about a 1/16 inch from the backing plate to ensure the pins don't bind. Also, I found if I added the flanges/holes as I described above, then did more welding on the large plate, it would warp just a bit. Then the top parts of the quick-tach plates on the Bobcat would no longer nest well inside the upper flange on the attachment plate, and I had to remove some metal on the bottom flange/hole plates so the pins would not bind. Hope this makes sense. --- Bob
Jim Sometime @ 1995 most manufacturers had given up on their odd ball quick attach and adopted the system that Bobcat used on all but there smallest and largest loader IE. 371, 443, 453,for the small ones and 975, 980 and some 963 for large loaders with a odd ball QA. However for thw last few years only the Mini Bobs have a odd ball QA. Strangely, for mini loaders, I believe everyone else has adopted a standard mini QA except bobcat. It just made sense for everyone else to switch to Bobcat one the average size machines, they had such a jump on the market share at that time I have heard there can be some variation on the pin spacing on the Std QA's even yet Ken
 

Mr Jimi

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2006
Messages
103
Jim --- My only data points are a 1995 751C Bobcat and a 743 Bobcat (year unknown, probably about 1993 or so). Both have the same pin arrangement, with the center of the pins right at 5 1/4 inches in from either edge of the attachment plate. When I build an attachment plate, I make the lower flange plates with holes starting at 4 1/4 inches in from the edges, 2 1/2 inches wide, and stopping at 6 3/4 inches in from the edges. The large attachment plate is about 44 5/8 inch wide, and the slop comes out to about a quarter of an inch sied-to-side when put it on my Bobcat. The hole size above seems to accommodate the pins OK, wherever the attachment ends up on the Bobcat. I could probably make the attachment 44 1/2 inches wide, but I'd sure hate to find I'd made one that was too narrow to fit on the next guy's skid steer, so I just put up with the 1/4 inch slop and leave the lower flange plate holes large enough to handle it. By the way, I make the plates with the holes in them by using three pieces of steel stock, each from 1/4 inch thick by 1 1/2 inch wide strap. One piece is 12 inches long, one is 4 1/4 inches long, and the other is 5 1/4 inches long. Weld them together and I end up with a hole right where it needs to be. I hang the large plate on the Bobcat, then (after disconnecting the battery, don't wanna blow out the BICS computer!) tack weld the flanges with holes in place so as to get the right angle to match the Bobcat quick-tach. Measuring angles and distances to get the flanges/holes correct is a bit beyond me, but the method above so far takes no thought and works perfectly every time with a nice tight fit. In some cases, I've had to position the flanges/holes out about a 1/16 inch from the backing plate to ensure the pins don't bind. Also, I found if I added the flanges/holes as I described above, then did more welding on the large plate, it would warp just a bit. Then the top parts of the quick-tach plates on the Bobcat would no longer nest well inside the upper flange on the attachment plate, and I had to remove some metal on the bottom flange/hole plates so the pins would not bind. Hope this makes sense. --- Bob
Bobbie-G , I sure wish you had pictures, you make this sound real simple. I like that simple and easy and right the first time.
I have to get this right the first cause when I weld something! It will not come apart and I don't want to take it apart
Jim
 

sterlclan

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Joined
May 1, 2004
Messages
528
Bobbie-G , I sure wish you had pictures, you make this sound real simple. I like that simple and easy and right the first time.
I have to get this right the first cause when I weld something! It will not come apart and I don't want to take it apart
Jim
the top of the plate where it hangs off the bobtach is 45 degrees I use a speed square for that one lay it on the plate and lay the flat stock on the square and weld it there the bottom I do the same as Bob using the bobtach as a jig
 

bobbie-g

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 15, 2004
Messages
574
the top of the plate where it hangs off the bobtach is 45 degrees I use a speed square for that one lay it on the plate and lay the flat stock on the square and weld it there the bottom I do the same as Bob using the bobtach as a jig
Mr Jimi -- email me your address if you don't mind, and I'll send you a sketch and a pix or two if I can find them. I don't have them on a website so I can't post them here yet. --- Bob [email protected]
 

Eric

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
Messages
169
Jim --- My only data points are a 1995 751C Bobcat and a 743 Bobcat (year unknown, probably about 1993 or so). Both have the same pin arrangement, with the center of the pins right at 5 1/4 inches in from either edge of the attachment plate. When I build an attachment plate, I make the lower flange plates with holes starting at 4 1/4 inches in from the edges, 2 1/2 inches wide, and stopping at 6 3/4 inches in from the edges. The large attachment plate is about 44 5/8 inch wide, and the slop comes out to about a quarter of an inch sied-to-side when put it on my Bobcat. The hole size above seems to accommodate the pins OK, wherever the attachment ends up on the Bobcat. I could probably make the attachment 44 1/2 inches wide, but I'd sure hate to find I'd made one that was too narrow to fit on the next guy's skid steer, so I just put up with the 1/4 inch slop and leave the lower flange plate holes large enough to handle it. By the way, I make the plates with the holes in them by using three pieces of steel stock, each from 1/4 inch thick by 1 1/2 inch wide strap. One piece is 12 inches long, one is 4 1/4 inches long, and the other is 5 1/4 inches long. Weld them together and I end up with a hole right where it needs to be. I hang the large plate on the Bobcat, then (after disconnecting the battery, don't wanna blow out the BICS computer!) tack weld the flanges with holes in place so as to get the right angle to match the Bobcat quick-tach. Measuring angles and distances to get the flanges/holes correct is a bit beyond me, but the method above so far takes no thought and works perfectly every time with a nice tight fit. In some cases, I've had to position the flanges/holes out about a 1/16 inch from the backing plate to ensure the pins don't bind. Also, I found if I added the flanges/holes as I described above, then did more welding on the large plate, it would warp just a bit. Then the top parts of the quick-tach plates on the Bobcat would no longer nest well inside the upper flange on the attachment plate, and I had to remove some metal on the bottom flange/hole plates so the pins would not bind. Hope this makes sense. --- Bob
Here are some pictures of Bobbie-G's bobtach plate.
bobcathitch(13).jpg

bobcathitch(14).jpg

grubberingarage5_16_04008.jpg
 

Mr Jimi

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2006
Messages
103
Here are some pictures of Bobbie-G's bobtach plate.
I measured my attach pins and mine, on my 1991 Case 1845C and they are 30 inches apart on centers, looks like I have an oddball? LOL
Jim
 
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