Minimum requirement for pulling a 763

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chuckinnc

Active member
Joined
Dec 4, 2007
Messages
31
I need to pull my 763 about 10-12 miles one way around 5-6 times a year, I dont want to buy a different truck just for my use so this is what I have. 1/2 ton Chevy 4x4 with 350 & 5 speed trans. If the truck would be ok to haul the 763 then I would need a reccomendation for the proper trailer to use, tandem with electric brakes on 2 or 4 or maybe a short 5th wheel?
 

pondfishr

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Joined
Oct 11, 2005
Messages
216
I have a Bobcat 743 that I occasionally need to move from place to place about like what you are talking about. I think the two machines are comparable in weight. I have a 1994 Chevy Z71 1/2 ton, 5.7L, 4X4, Automatic trans, with towing package. I also have a Cronkite 18' 2 5/16" ball heavy duty 10k bumper pull equipment trailer. I had the same idea and took mine to a truck shop to look at getting a Goose neck hitch and helper springs installed. The mechanic told me that towing a heavy load like a skid steer could cause my frame to twist. 1/2 ton trucks have a thinner frame than a 3/4 or 1 ton. He would not guarantee the work and I finally decided it would be better to get a heavier truck to pull the machine rather than try to upgrade mine. When I have used it I wasn't happy with the stability of the vehicle with the load and you definitely need brakes on the trailer. I would recommend at least a 3/4 ton if not a 1 ton truck if you want to be safe and legal. Your 5 speed might help some but overall the 1/2 ton truck was not designed to safely tow a skid steer.
 

Cam2

Active member
Joined
Mar 14, 2007
Messages
26
I have a Bobcat 743 that I occasionally need to move from place to place about like what you are talking about. I think the two machines are comparable in weight. I have a 1994 Chevy Z71 1/2 ton, 5.7L, 4X4, Automatic trans, with towing package. I also have a Cronkite 18' 2 5/16" ball heavy duty 10k bumper pull equipment trailer. I had the same idea and took mine to a truck shop to look at getting a Goose neck hitch and helper springs installed. The mechanic told me that towing a heavy load like a skid steer could cause my frame to twist. 1/2 ton trucks have a thinner frame than a 3/4 or 1 ton. He would not guarantee the work and I finally decided it would be better to get a heavier truck to pull the machine rather than try to upgrade mine. When I have used it I wasn't happy with the stability of the vehicle with the load and you definitely need brakes on the trailer. I would recommend at least a 3/4 ton if not a 1 ton truck if you want to be safe and legal. Your 5 speed might help some but overall the 1/2 ton truck was not designed to safely tow a skid steer.
Providing you have the right trailer, brakes and controller, correct hitch and reciever....your truck should be fine. The only thing I'd question and you left out of your description, is if your truck were a short bed SWB, or the long bed.
 

jerry

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Joined
May 3, 2007
Messages
2,043
I have a Bobcat 743 that I occasionally need to move from place to place about like what you are talking about. I think the two machines are comparable in weight. I have a 1994 Chevy Z71 1/2 ton, 5.7L, 4X4, Automatic trans, with towing package. I also have a Cronkite 18' 2 5/16" ball heavy duty 10k bumper pull equipment trailer. I had the same idea and took mine to a truck shop to look at getting a Goose neck hitch and helper springs installed. The mechanic told me that towing a heavy load like a skid steer could cause my frame to twist. 1/2 ton trucks have a thinner frame than a 3/4 or 1 ton. He would not guarantee the work and I finally decided it would be better to get a heavier truck to pull the machine rather than try to upgrade mine. When I have used it I wasn't happy with the stability of the vehicle with the load and you definitely need brakes on the trailer. I would recommend at least a 3/4 ton if not a 1 ton truck if you want to be safe and legal. Your 5 speed might help some but overall the 1/2 ton truck was not designed to safely tow a skid steer.
Hi, I have a 632 weighs about 4000 and haul it on a tandem 7000 lb 16 ft trailer 2 inch ball with out using a wd hitch. It handles good at higher speeds of up to 60 mph and our 98 chev 1/2 ton with a 5.7 had no problem with it. There are a lot of 1/2 ton trucks pulling travel trailers grossing 6 or 8000. However your machine probably weighs at least 1000 more than ours, if you had a trailer rated for 10000 and used a weight distributing hitch I don't think there would be any problem unless you are in hilly country where you would run out of power. Our travel trailer grosses about 5500 and the 98 chev did fine with it but now we have a 3/4 ton chev with the 6.0 and it is a much better tow vehicle on hills. You will need brakes and your d.o.t. will tell you how many axles have to have them. Having the right hitch and setting it up right makes a big difference. adding a sway bar to the hitch will take out any wiggle also. The people on the Open Roads forum will give you all kinds of opinions on this.
 

triad

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 10, 2007
Messages
65
Going 12 miles won't be to bad, but I wouldn't push it.You HAVE to have trailer brakes no question just make sure your hitch and tailer have the correct GVW. If you can avoid jerking the trailer and take it easy you should be alright. You might even consider some air bags if you don't want to beef up your springs. Remember that truck is not made for that kind of hauling...go easy. Steve
 

Idoitall

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Joined
Mar 17, 2007
Messages
126
Going 12 miles won't be to bad, but I wouldn't push it.You HAVE to have trailer brakes no question just make sure your hitch and tailer have the correct GVW. If you can avoid jerking the trailer and take it easy you should be alright. You might even consider some air bags if you don't want to beef up your springs. Remember that truck is not made for that kind of hauling...go easy. Steve
Do yourself a great favor. Get a knowledgeable trailer person to help you select the right trailer and help setup your truck and trailer for towing. As said, BRAKES ARE A MUST. Towing the load is not near as big an issue as stopping it, especially in a sudden situation. And trust me on this, you will get in those situations if you tow.

Like many others here, I have seen or done it all when it comes to trailers. No brakes, no lights, no tag, no safety chains, too light, too heavy, to long, too short, incorrectly loaded, worn tires, and so on. It's just something dumb that we do, especially since "I was just going across town". Fortunately, I have never had an incident worse than a flat tire. Nowadays, my Bother and I maintain a good setup and WE DON'T LOAN IT OUT!!!! Having a gooseneck type trailer pretty much eliminates this.

Today is a much different world. Not only are there are a lot more laws concerning trailers and towing, there is a lot more emphasis on enforcement. Our State D.O.T. folks are writing tickets everywhere for violations and when they stop you, they go over it with a magnifying glass. Here, you have to get a D.O.T. number and be in compliance if you tow a piece equipment such as a SS, even for personal use. Also, there are the looming lawsuits waiting for you if you are involved in an accident and ANYTHING is out of compliance, especially brakes, lights, weight, and GVW. Finally, make sure you are properly insured for towing.
 

jmatt20

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2005
Messages
127
Do yourself a great favor. Get a knowledgeable trailer person to help you select the right trailer and help setup your truck and trailer for towing. As said, BRAKES ARE A MUST. Towing the load is not near as big an issue as stopping it, especially in a sudden situation. And trust me on this, you will get in those situations if you tow.

Like many others here, I have seen or done it all when it comes to trailers. No brakes, no lights, no tag, no safety chains, too light, too heavy, to long, too short, incorrectly loaded, worn tires, and so on. It's just something dumb that we do, especially since "I was just going across town". Fortunately, I have never had an incident worse than a flat tire. Nowadays, my Bother and I maintain a good setup and WE DON'T LOAN IT OUT!!!! Having a gooseneck type trailer pretty much eliminates this.

Today is a much different world. Not only are there are a lot more laws concerning trailers and towing, there is a lot more emphasis on enforcement. Our State D.O.T. folks are writing tickets everywhere for violations and when they stop you, they go over it with a magnifying glass. Here, you have to get a D.O.T. number and be in compliance if you tow a piece equipment such as a SS, even for personal use. Also, there are the looming lawsuits waiting for you if you are involved in an accident and ANYTHING is out of compliance, especially brakes, lights, weight, and GVW. Finally, make sure you are properly insured for towing.
in CA. if your trailer weighs less than 10,000 lbs. gross you don't need a special liscense or dot numbers .this is for non travel trailers, you can tow a travel trailer of any weight with a regular liscense and no dot numbers.( travel trailer manufactures have a good lobby???). for the weight of the 763 plus buckets plus the trailer you should be able to stay under 10,000 but you most likely will need at least a two axle trailer. towing a trailer you will get there a lot quicker at 50 mph without an accident than at 65mph with an accident if your not used to pulling a trailer take it easy untill you get the feel of the rig.
 

pelpel

Active member
Joined
Jan 28, 2007
Messages
43
As I do this commercially, here are the rules: 1. determine the trucks Legal towrating and Legal Gross Combined Weight rating (weight of truck / cargo / trailer) 2. determine the weight of your bobcat / and proposed trailer (I would suggest a proper equipment trailer with electric brakes on a 2 5/16' ball or pintle hook). Make sure the weight of trailer / bobcat will not exceed legal rating mentioned in point 1. 3. Call your local insurance auhority to see if your truck needs different plates / insurance and / or needs to report to highway scales. 4. If, and only if, your GCWR is enough to handle the trailer / bobcat combo, get your truck setup for brakes / wiring / etc. 5. I would suspect a 763 would come in at 5000 - 6000 lbs. Add a trailer of about 2000 lbs., you're looking at 7000 - 8000 lbs. I would think that to be a bit on the high side for a half ton. see below for a 1996 1/2 ton tow rating: Year Make Model Engine Tow Limit 1996 Chevrolet K1500 Pickup (4WD) 5.7 V-8 7000 lbs. trailer Requires 3.73:1 axle ratio. Requires Z82 Trailering Special Package. Requires engine-oil cooler. Requires transmission-oil cooler. Requires weight-distributing hitch. To sum it all up, all I ask is that you do it legally, the repercussions will be painful if you were to get into an accident. I apologize for being so plunt about this, but a 1/2 ton towing 7-8k trailer will like the tail wagging the dog. be safe........
 

pondfishr

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 11, 2005
Messages
216
As I do this commercially, here are the rules: 1. determine the trucks Legal towrating and Legal Gross Combined Weight rating (weight of truck / cargo / trailer) 2. determine the weight of your bobcat / and proposed trailer (I would suggest a proper equipment trailer with electric brakes on a 2 5/16' ball or pintle hook). Make sure the weight of trailer / bobcat will not exceed legal rating mentioned in point 1. 3. Call your local insurance auhority to see if your truck needs different plates / insurance and / or needs to report to highway scales. 4. If, and only if, your GCWR is enough to handle the trailer / bobcat combo, get your truck setup for brakes / wiring / etc. 5. I would suspect a 763 would come in at 5000 - 6000 lbs. Add a trailer of about 2000 lbs., you're looking at 7000 - 8000 lbs. I would think that to be a bit on the high side for a half ton. see below for a 1996 1/2 ton tow rating: Year Make Model Engine Tow Limit 1996 Chevrolet K1500 Pickup (4WD) 5.7 V-8 7000 lbs. trailer Requires 3.73:1 axle ratio. Requires Z82 Trailering Special Package. Requires engine-oil cooler. Requires transmission-oil cooler. Requires weight-distributing hitch. To sum it all up, all I ask is that you do it legally, the repercussions will be painful if you were to get into an accident. I apologize for being so plunt about this, but a 1/2 ton towing 7-8k trailer will like the tail wagging the dog. be safe........
I want to add that I live in a very hilly area. If you are pulling on flat surfaces it will help. Pelpel is right make sure you are safe and legal for obvious reasons.
 

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