McLaren Over The Tire Tracks

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LIMaint

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Jan 12, 2007
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Has anyone used McLaren over the tire tracks on their Skid Loaders? I'm close to buying a set of their tracks for my Cat 236 I'm hoping that they work well. I'm looking for a little help with floatation. The machine has the power but needs a little help getting the power to the ground, a loss of traction when you're pushing into a pile of soil sucks. Any feedback would be appriciated. Thanks
 

skidsteer.ca

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Jan 20, 2006
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You will be happy with the increase in traction of any over the tire track because you will have to spin all the material out between the tires on each side as opposes to digging 4 small tires holes in order to get the loader to spin. it makes filling you bucket much easier. I run steel tracks on 2 of my machines all summer unless they are going to work on concrete or asphalt.
I have never used the McLaren brand, but they look like a quality product. You can fully rebuild them by bolting one new pads and changing your side links and pivot pins.
I would however encourage you to explore the cost of such a rebuilt compared to the easy and convience of just buying new again. Also the time it will take to remove all those rusty bolts.
The Tracks Plus brand we sell for your loader list at 1389.00 Last 1500 to 1800 hours, can have any of the 3 parts that make the track up replaced should one become damage with 2 3/4 wrenches. Offer better floatation becasue they have a large pad area and they weigh less (@ 550 lbs) Which also makes them alot less of a battle to install too.
At any rate I sure you will be happy with the improved performance regardless of which brand you choose.
Ken
 

rock

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Oct 20, 2007
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Hi LIMaint. I just came across some prior discussion exactly on this topic. Please note that these are not my words since I have no experience whatsoever on OTT. Hope it helps:..... Re: McLaren tracks Posted: 02-11-2007 11:00 PM We sell McLarens and 2Plus. There is definately a difference between the tracks different abilities. You have to look at what you are going to do with them. If you are just doing light landscaping around your own property, then 2Plus is the way to go. If you are a heavy commercial user, then go for Protracs. They are far more aggressive and provide much better traction in tough conditions. I have put a season on each type and prefer each type for different uses. Tracksplus tracks are NOT rebuildable. Yes you can change a link, but the track plate is still worn. Protrac Magnums allow you to change the bushing, link and even the pad.
 

mclarenusa.com

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Oct 22, 2007
Messages
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Hi LIMaint,
As you may already know we offer 3 different styles of Protrac: the Diamond, Magnum, and Rubber. We've had plenty of positive feedbacks from our customers, many of them first time McLaren track users just like yourself. Be sure to explain what you want to have your machine accomplish. Our Diamonds will offer great traction, but our Magnums and Rubber will offer great floatation. If you have any other specific questions I'd be happy to help you out.
www.mclarenusa.com
 

reliefdvm

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Jun 4, 2007
Messages
6
Hi LIMaint,
As you may already know we offer 3 different styles of Protrac: the Diamond, Magnum, and Rubber. We've had plenty of positive feedbacks from our customers, many of them first time McLaren track users just like yourself. Be sure to explain what you want to have your machine accomplish. Our Diamonds will offer great traction, but our Magnums and Rubber will offer great floatation. If you have any other specific questions I'd be happy to help you out.
www.mclarenusa.com
I bought some pro-trac Diamond last year. I bought them used - the owner was selling them because he had just gotten his long driveway paved so he bought the pro-trac rubber so he would not tear it up. He was very pleased with mclaren overall. They work great. They make the machine (JD 317) feel much more stable. They work well in snow except the spring time slushy stuff - it builds up ice in between the bars. I think that if you are looking for flotation in really soft stuff, go with the 2plus (budget) or magnums. For traction in dry and some mud - I don't think you can beat the diamonds. They are very heavy and don't believe the 15 minute installation time. Allen Cloutier Lafayette, CO
 

skidsteer.ca

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I bought some pro-trac Diamond last year. I bought them used - the owner was selling them because he had just gotten his long driveway paved so he bought the pro-trac rubber so he would not tear it up. He was very pleased with mclaren overall. They work great. They make the machine (JD 317) feel much more stable. They work well in snow except the spring time slushy stuff - it builds up ice in between the bars. I think that if you are looking for flotation in really soft stuff, go with the 2plus (budget) or magnums. For traction in dry and some mud - I don't think you can beat the diamonds. They are very heavy and don't believe the 15 minute installation time. Allen Cloutier Lafayette, CO
Allan, all
I know the Tracks Plus or 2 Plus tracks suffer from wet snow packing inside the pad. They work great in dry snow, though like most steel tracks are prone to sliding sideways, perhaps with the exception of the the diamond bar tracks.
If I did alot of winter brushmowing I'd weld some small side biters on the track like are often added to cats and backhoes. But its not so bad I can't live with it.
I would'nt of thought the double bar tracks like the Grouser and Protracs would be prone to snow packing though. Good to know.
I have installed the Grouser, Loegering and Tracks Plus though and I can definitely vouch for the latter being much easier to install because the weight is more manageable. If you need to put them on or off alot or are prone to flat tires, think about this
If you are looking to counter weight the machine for stability or to increase traction on firm ground then the heavy brands have a edge in this area. If your going for mud or swamp performance, go light.
As far as traction goes the shape of the outside of the pad is not that critical except on snow/ice.
As for any track being re buildable for ever though I should post some pics of my old Loegerings. It shows the significant amount of wear tracks get from the tire side. There is always sand and grit between the tire and the track and over the life of the track it takes it toll from the tire slipping on the inside too.
I welded up those tracks with mig wire on the inside and hard surfacing on the outside. But the pivot pins were a rivot in so there was no easy repair there. I sold that machine and tracks a year later and to my knowledge they are still seeing limited service at a fellows cabin. However it was alot of work to build both sides up and dress the inside down so it was not too hard on the tires. Also they could only be shortend 4 more inches and that was it. I felt the pivots were 1/2 used at the time I rebuilt them and the pads were a couple hundred hours from breaking down the center
For the time and money I put into them to prevent the pad from breaking down the center, I know it would have been more cost effective to replace them with new. Considering what new ones can be had for now.
One final point. I don't believe the difference in traction between one brand and another is near as large as the mfg's videos would like you to think. If you have never run tracks, any track will make a huge improvement in traction/pushing power on soft or loose soils. The heavier the track, the more you will sink into soft ground and the more stabil your machine will feel with a heavy load.
Ken
 

skidsteer.ca

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Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
Allan, all
I know the Tracks Plus or 2 Plus tracks suffer from wet snow packing inside the pad. They work great in dry snow, though like most steel tracks are prone to sliding sideways, perhaps with the exception of the the diamond bar tracks.
If I did alot of winter brushmowing I'd weld some small side biters on the track like are often added to cats and backhoes. But its not so bad I can't live with it.
I would'nt of thought the double bar tracks like the Grouser and Protracs would be prone to snow packing though. Good to know.
I have installed the Grouser, Loegering and Tracks Plus though and I can definitely vouch for the latter being much easier to install because the weight is more manageable. If you need to put them on or off alot or are prone to flat tires, think about this
If you are looking to counter weight the machine for stability or to increase traction on firm ground then the heavy brands have a edge in this area. If your going for mud or swamp performance, go light.
As far as traction goes the shape of the outside of the pad is not that critical except on snow/ice.
As for any track being re buildable for ever though I should post some pics of my old Loegerings. It shows the significant amount of wear tracks get from the tire side. There is always sand and grit between the tire and the track and over the life of the track it takes it toll from the tire slipping on the inside too.
I welded up those tracks with mig wire on the inside and hard surfacing on the outside. But the pivot pins were a rivot in so there was no easy repair there. I sold that machine and tracks a year later and to my knowledge they are still seeing limited service at a fellows cabin. However it was alot of work to build both sides up and dress the inside down so it was not too hard on the tires. Also they could only be shortend 4 more inches and that was it. I felt the pivots were 1/2 used at the time I rebuilt them and the pads were a couple hundred hours from breaking down the center
For the time and money I put into them to prevent the pad from breaking down the center, I know it would have been more cost effective to replace them with new. Considering what new ones can be had for now.
One final point. I don't believe the difference in traction between one brand and another is near as large as the mfg's videos would like you to think. If you have never run tracks, any track will make a huge improvement in traction/pushing power on soft or loose soils. The heavier the track, the more you will sink into soft ground and the more stabil your machine will feel with a heavy load.
Ken
Here is a picture of the tire side (inside) of the loegering track pad.


IMG_1237.JPG

Here is a picture of the leading edge, these 2 places and the pivots are where most of the wear takes place
IMG_1241.JPG

IMG_1242.JPG

IMG_1243.JPG

Tracks plus pad with Loegeuring
IMG_1244.JPG

Ken
 

bobbyg

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2006
Messages
15
Here is a picture of the tire side (inside) of the loegering track pad.



Here is a picture of the leading edge, these 2 places and the pivots are where most of the wear takes place



Tracks plus pad with Loegeuring

Ken
i bot a pair of mclaren ott last yr...i bot the rubber ott..they have definately allowed me to get more days of work in the wet weather...i never get stuck in the mud anymore...and can climb some decent sized hills on the downside, i only put about 200 hrs on them and they already need new pads...they are such a bitch to get on/off that i left them on too long this spring...i just put them back on a few wks ago (took about 1.5 hours)... i went w/ rubber bc i do all kinds of skid steer work and very often work on the hard surface...i actually need to find out how much a mclaren rubber shoe costs...anyone know?
 

LIMaint

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Joined
Jan 12, 2007
Messages
30
i bot a pair of mclaren ott last yr...i bot the rubber ott..they have definately allowed me to get more days of work in the wet weather...i never get stuck in the mud anymore...and can climb some decent sized hills on the downside, i only put about 200 hrs on them and they already need new pads...they are such a bitch to get on/off that i left them on too long this spring...i just put them back on a few wks ago (took about 1.5 hours)... i went w/ rubber bc i do all kinds of skid steer work and very often work on the hard surface...i actually need to find out how much a mclaren rubber shoe costs...anyone know?
I finally got the tracks on,it took about a full day....but they are awesome they are a big improvement over just tires. I did an inground pool demo after a rain storm and they actually worked better than I expected.
 

rock

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Oct 20, 2007
Messages
27
I finally got the tracks on,it took about a full day....but they are awesome they are a big improvement over just tires. I did an inground pool demo after a rain storm and they actually worked better than I expected.
Hi LIMaint, which tracks did you end up getting? Can you post a picture?
 

A.G.

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Joined
Nov 4, 2004
Messages
39
I have been thinking of purchasing a set for site clearing. Just haven't got around to it yet. I did buy the McLaren tires that are solid with holes. You can't really track up foam filled tires, but with the McLarens you have that option. Also I would say the tires are more stable than foam filled, and because they are about 50 pounds lighter per tire you have more power. It takes less horsepower to change direction with them and the loader seems faster on the ground, with less groaning from the hyd.
Over the tire tracks don't really beat a dedicated track machine, but they are an interesting low cost option vs. a dedicated track loader.
.02 A.G.
 

skidsteer.ca

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Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
I have been thinking of purchasing a set for site clearing. Just haven't got around to it yet. I did buy the McLaren tires that are solid with holes. You can't really track up foam filled tires, but with the McLarens you have that option. Also I would say the tires are more stable than foam filled, and because they are about 50 pounds lighter per tire you have more power. It takes less horsepower to change direction with them and the loader seems faster on the ground, with less groaning from the hyd.
Over the tire tracks don't really beat a dedicated track machine, but they are an interesting low cost option vs. a dedicated track loader.
.02 A.G.
AG
We have been running tracks on one of our loaders with foram filled tires for 3 years now without any trouble. I would estimate that if you loader feels more stable on semi solid tires then they must be firmer then foam filled.
Ott tracks are certainly not going to replace applications where a track machine is need, but are a lower investment/ lower operating cost of getting at least 1/2 there.
Ken
 

A.G.

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Nov 4, 2004
Messages
39
AG
We have been running tracks on one of our loaders with foram filled tires for 3 years now without any trouble. I would estimate that if you loader feels more stable on semi solid tires then they must be firmer then foam filled.
Ott tracks are certainly not going to replace applications where a track machine is need, but are a lower investment/ lower operating cost of getting at least 1/2 there.
Ken
My dealer would not recommend tracks over foam filled, but it sounds like your setup is doing just fine.
The foam filled ones I was using felt like driving on water ballons, for lack of a better description. It was more noticeable with the loader arms up/going up with a load and a turn. (You aren't really supposed to executing turns, going up or at full height with a load, that's how loaders get turned over.)
The Mclaren tires seem to sit at a wider stance, with the wheel offset they come with. I think that was by design to make more room for over the tire tracks. They also have a narrow footprint and no sidewalls sticking out, looks like they were made for the tracks.
My old foam fillied ones would probably go a bit farther in the mud, due to more footprint.
One other interesting note about them, is people notice the Mclaren tires. They always ask questions about them, and then of course the loader. One time, I had to stop at my tire shop, due to bad nail in my trailer tire. The loader was up there, with the Mclarens. The tire guys were checking them out, and one just shook his head (in defeat) and walked away. He knew I would not be coming in with flats on that machine. I thought it was very funny at the time!
A.G.
 

skidsteer.ca

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Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
My dealer would not recommend tracks over foam filled, but it sounds like your setup is doing just fine.
The foam filled ones I was using felt like driving on water ballons, for lack of a better description. It was more noticeable with the loader arms up/going up with a load and a turn. (You aren't really supposed to executing turns, going up or at full height with a load, that's how loaders get turned over.)
The Mclaren tires seem to sit at a wider stance, with the wheel offset they come with. I think that was by design to make more room for over the tire tracks. They also have a narrow footprint and no sidewalls sticking out, looks like they were made for the tracks.
My old foam fillied ones would probably go a bit farther in the mud, due to more footprint.
One other interesting note about them, is people notice the Mclaren tires. They always ask questions about them, and then of course the loader. One time, I had to stop at my tire shop, due to bad nail in my trailer tire. The loader was up there, with the Mclarens. The tire guys were checking them out, and one just shook his head (in defeat) and walked away. He knew I would not be coming in with flats on that machine. I thought it was very funny at the time!
A.G.
No doubt the semi solid is a vary durabable tire design. They look cool. I'm not sure what you would have to do to ruin one. Bomb blasts come to mind, but short of that, I don't think its possible. I just wish the price was a little better. But sometimes I'd gladly pay “big money” to be trouble free on some of our equipment. The skidsteers I don't have that much trouble with.
The foam tires I have came on the loader when I bought it and in my estimation they behave no different then air tires with 50 psi in them. I like @ 35 psi personally and find them a bit rough. Also on my NH I'm glad the air filled tires are 600 lbs lighter for the set. For brushing on soft ground, light is the way to go.
I was shocked how my 773 sank when I brought it home, compared to my 753.
Both are on the same tires, but it weights 1000lbs more and another 600 for the foam tires, so 4700 lbs versue 6300 on the same tire, makes a huge difference.
I slime my air filled tires www.slime.com for punchers up to 1/4” I also have a compessor and a plug kit with me most days, which has save my butt a time or two in the past.
Can McClaren press new tires on the wheels it sells? Just curious.
Ken
 

A.G.

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Nov 4, 2004
Messages
39
No doubt the semi solid is a vary durabable tire design. They look cool. I'm not sure what you would have to do to ruin one. Bomb blasts come to mind, but short of that, I don't think its possible. I just wish the price was a little better. But sometimes I'd gladly pay “big money” to be trouble free on some of our equipment. The skidsteers I don't have that much trouble with.
The foam tires I have came on the loader when I bought it and in my estimation they behave no different then air tires with 50 psi in them. I like @ 35 psi personally and find them a bit rough. Also on my NH I'm glad the air filled tires are 600 lbs lighter for the set. For brushing on soft ground, light is the way to go.
I was shocked how my 773 sank when I brought it home, compared to my 753.
Both are on the same tires, but it weights 1000lbs more and another 600 for the foam tires, so 4700 lbs versue 6300 on the same tire, makes a huge difference.
I slime my air filled tires www.slime.com for punchers up to 1/4” I also have a compessor and a plug kit with me most days, which has save my butt a time or two in the past.
Can McClaren press new tires on the wheels it sells? Just curious.
Ken
I have no idea if they can reuse those wheels. Probably not, as the tires are made overseas, and probably welded over there. They have not slipped around the rim.
My brand spanking new Bobcat wheels/tires were set aside in case I really need to get light at a job. Hasn't happened yet.
My old foam filled ones had been recapped too many times, and looking at new wheels, tires, foam, put the McLarens at a great price point.
I have been able to cut some of the edges of the cheveron lugs, but they ride fine, just like the video. The tire really rides on the center of the tread, so if you cut a lug off the side, you can't feel it. They came out with a more durable tread pattern for demo nuts like myself, or junkyard dog loaders.
Often I will use the tires to destroy something. Like a wood wall, with several layers of wood sheathing. I can jump on it and spin, loosening the materials, blowing off the wood, and grinding it into splinters. People get a kick out of it. Most often I will use them to hold down my workpiece while I pick at it with my grapple. By sitting on it, the loader becomes my vise, and I can really rip it apart, or take it apart very precisely. My tires are an extension of my will, and I use the whole machine, not just the attachment. If you have a piece dangling from a scrap grapple, that is going to be a hazard, just run over it and pull it out of the bucket while not losing the entire load.
I like em.
A.G.
 

skidsteer.ca

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I have no idea if they can reuse those wheels. Probably not, as the tires are made overseas, and probably welded over there. They have not slipped around the rim.
My brand spanking new Bobcat wheels/tires were set aside in case I really need to get light at a job. Hasn't happened yet.
My old foam filled ones had been recapped too many times, and looking at new wheels, tires, foam, put the McLarens at a great price point.
I have been able to cut some of the edges of the cheveron lugs, but they ride fine, just like the video. The tire really rides on the center of the tread, so if you cut a lug off the side, you can't feel it. They came out with a more durable tread pattern for demo nuts like myself, or junkyard dog loaders.
Often I will use the tires to destroy something. Like a wood wall, with several layers of wood sheathing. I can jump on it and spin, loosening the materials, blowing off the wood, and grinding it into splinters. People get a kick out of it. Most often I will use them to hold down my workpiece while I pick at it with my grapple. By sitting on it, the loader becomes my vise, and I can really rip it apart, or take it apart very precisely. My tires are an extension of my will, and I use the whole machine, not just the attachment. If you have a piece dangling from a scrap grapple, that is going to be a hazard, just run over it and pull it out of the bucket while not losing the entire load.
I like em.
A.G.
I can see for demo they would be king. I do some of what you mention to but I'd never dive into a pile or twisted rebar or simular. I'd think the McClarens will all but completely replace solids. I'm sure they are a great product if you have the need.
My foamys have never been capped so maybe they soften with age??
Ken
 

rock

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Joined
Oct 20, 2007
Messages
27
No doubt the semi solid is a vary durabable tire design. They look cool. I'm not sure what you would have to do to ruin one. Bomb blasts come to mind, but short of that, I don't think its possible. I just wish the price was a little better. But sometimes I'd gladly pay “big money” to be trouble free on some of our equipment. The skidsteers I don't have that much trouble with.
The foam tires I have came on the loader when I bought it and in my estimation they behave no different then air tires with 50 psi in them. I like @ 35 psi personally and find them a bit rough. Also on my NH I'm glad the air filled tires are 600 lbs lighter for the set. For brushing on soft ground, light is the way to go.
I was shocked how my 773 sank when I brought it home, compared to my 753.
Both are on the same tires, but it weights 1000lbs more and another 600 for the foam tires, so 4700 lbs versue 6300 on the same tire, makes a huge difference.
I slime my air filled tires www.slime.com for punchers up to 1/4” I also have a compessor and a plug kit with me most days, which has save my butt a time or two in the past.
Can McClaren press new tires on the wheels it sells? Just curious.
Ken
Yes, the flat proof McLaren tires can be pressed on and off... I was also wondering this exact question, since I don't want to pay for extra rims every time, so I called McLaren a while back. The sales rep told me any local tire dealer with a press machine can press on and off their tires. He also told me I can order from McLaren tires without rims for a substantially lower price - I like that :)
I think McLaren has quite an important advantage over the tires I can get from my CAT dealer. My CAT dealer said the flat proof tires they offer were glued to the rims, so they couldn't be pressed off. They are also much pricier. It's strange (or just stupid) McLaren doesn't advertise their tire's press-on-and off capability on their site: www.mclarenusa.com.
Anyway, now when I hear what you guys are doing with these tires, I'm all set to buy a set of tires myself... For about 2 months I've been researching the market for flat proof tires and I'm already convinced McLaren's are the best. Plus no one can beat their 10 day money back guarantee. Will keep you posted how it goes with my new set of McLaren Nu-Air tires...
 

perry

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Joined
Aug 22, 2006
Messages
869
Yes, the flat proof McLaren tires can be pressed on and off... I was also wondering this exact question, since I don't want to pay for extra rims every time, so I called McLaren a while back. The sales rep told me any local tire dealer with a press machine can press on and off their tires. He also told me I can order from McLaren tires without rims for a substantially lower price - I like that :)
I think McLaren has quite an important advantage over the tires I can get from my CAT dealer. My CAT dealer said the flat proof tires they offer were glued to the rims, so they couldn't be pressed off. They are also much pricier. It's strange (or just stupid) McLaren doesn't advertise their tire's press-on-and off capability on their site: www.mclarenusa.com.
Anyway, now when I hear what you guys are doing with these tires, I'm all set to buy a set of tires myself... For about 2 months I've been researching the market for flat proof tires and I'm already convinced McLaren's are the best. Plus no one can beat their 10 day money back guarantee. Will keep you posted how it goes with my new set of McLaren Nu-Air tires...
After looking around I picked up a set of use (barely) SkidTrax, there steel and thicker than others I've seen. Anyone have experience with 'skidtrax'?.
 

mclarenusa.com

Active member
Joined
Oct 22, 2007
Messages
41
My dealer would not recommend tracks over foam filled, but it sounds like your setup is doing just fine.
The foam filled ones I was using felt like driving on water ballons, for lack of a better description. It was more noticeable with the loader arms up/going up with a load and a turn. (You aren't really supposed to executing turns, going up or at full height with a load, that's how loaders get turned over.)
The Mclaren tires seem to sit at a wider stance, with the wheel offset they come with. I think that was by design to make more room for over the tire tracks. They also have a narrow footprint and no sidewalls sticking out, looks like they were made for the tracks.
My old foam fillied ones would probably go a bit farther in the mud, due to more footprint.
One other interesting note about them, is people notice the Mclaren tires. They always ask questions about them, and then of course the loader. One time, I had to stop at my tire shop, due to bad nail in my trailer tire. The loader was up there, with the Mclarens. The tire guys were checking them out, and one just shook his head (in defeat) and walked away. He knew I would not be coming in with flats on that machine. I thought it was very funny at the time!
A.G.
Hello A.G.
Just wanted to clarify that our Nu-Air semi-pneumatic tires can be pressed on/off and we do offer the rim and the tire separately. They generally will require a press machine which can be found at most fork lift repair shops as forklifts uses tires with rim/tire style.
We normally do not recommend any foam-filled tires with our Protracs as they do not flex as well as a pnematic tire or a semi-pneumatic tire. And you are correct on your statement of our rims being offset, they are designed that way to provide more spacing between the tires and the machine so the OTT track can be mounted on without the use of wheel spacers.
Please let me know if you have any additional questions.
www.mclarenusa.com
 
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