Linkages between a hoe and bucket.

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Tazza

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I have an older style hoe that i am going to re-build a bit. I want to make a few new buckets and was considering modifying the existing setup to the same basic style as the new buckets.
The setup it has now has the bucket curl ram attach directally to the bucket. and it has a pivot pin that that holds the bucket to the arm. I thought the later style basically have an adapter that has the pivot point and ram attaching and that entire *adapter plate* attaches to the bucket. Is this correct or is it just for specific machines?
The only reason i want to do it this way is to prevent me having to pull 2 greased pins out in dirty/sandy soil to replace a bucket then keep it all clean then re-grease before i can use it again. I'm probably being silly as i bet i won't change buckets often but its an option and then i don't need to make multiple adapter plates to weld to the new buckets.
I bought a mill last week so i can bore the holes out on the rams and install bushings. I have wanted a mill for so long, when i get some tooling made i will be making plenty of metal chips :)
I just need to get the Morse taper cutting sorted out, its not as easy as it looks to get the angle spot on! I think i need to build a jig for the lathe, they want $600 for one in the shops!!!
 

Tazza

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So you'll be making a progressive linkage from the hydraulic cylinder to the bucket then?
I hope to if the linkage isn't insanely complicated. It just needs to remain tough enough for me to not pull it clean off the bucket when digging.
 

bobcat_ron

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I hope to if the linkage isn't insanely complicated. It just needs to remain tough enough for me to not pull it clean off the bucket when digging.
If you build it right, it'll be good, use some 1x2x5/16"square tubing and weld in some pipe sections for the bushing/pin assemblies, as long as the shackle between the bucket and the cylinder shackle is strong enough.
 

jerry

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Tazza, are you cutting a male morse taper? If you do not have a taper attachment on the lathe and you have sufficient travel on your compound you can chuck up and indicate a factory part such as a big drill or such with the taper you want and then indicate the compound travel true to the part. It is a pain because you will have to hand feed it but it works good for a part or two. Jerry
 

Tazza

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Tazza, are you cutting a male morse taper? If you do not have a taper attachment on the lathe and you have sufficient travel on your compound you can chuck up and indicate a factory part such as a big drill or such with the taper you want and then indicate the compound travel true to the part. It is a pain because you will have to hand feed it but it works good for a part or two. Jerry
Bobcat_Ron - i'm going to machine out the rams and press sleeves in, just like what i did on my 743. The new pins and bushings will be 41-40 steel, after machining they will be nitrided. This way i can eliminate just about all slop, with tight tolerances will help keep any dirt out. Its also harder wearing than the old pipe trick (which i know does work) i just don't want to have to work on it again.
Jerry - It is a male morese taper i need to do. My compound slide isn't quite long enough to make the full cut in one pass. I don't like the slight wobble you feel as you move the slide from its limits as its not fully supported in the dovetail. It does work, but i just need to spend more time setting the angle. The last one from what i could measure was out .007” from end to end. Still, thats pretty darn close but needs to be almost perfect. I think i really need to setup a dial gauge to get the angle spot on, i just need to get one first. The way you suggest is exactly what i did. I threw a grinding attachment in the lathe to use as a guide.
 

jerry

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Bobcat_Ron - i'm going to machine out the rams and press sleeves in, just like what i did on my 743. The new pins and bushings will be 41-40 steel, after machining they will be nitrided. This way i can eliminate just about all slop, with tight tolerances will help keep any dirt out. Its also harder wearing than the old pipe trick (which i know does work) i just don't want to have to work on it again.
Jerry - It is a male morese taper i need to do. My compound slide isn't quite long enough to make the full cut in one pass. I don't like the slight wobble you feel as you move the slide from its limits as its not fully supported in the dovetail. It does work, but i just need to spend more time setting the angle. The last one from what i could measure was out .007” from end to end. Still, thats pretty darn close but needs to be almost perfect. I think i really need to setup a dial gauge to get the angle spot on, i just need to get one first. The way you suggest is exactly what i did. I threw a grinding attachment in the lathe to use as a guide.
Tazza, you could always buy a taper from Enco and weld it on but it would not be near as much fun and I think you will succeed quite well with the way you are doing it. If you see drills with the right taper at sales cheap they can be sawed off right below the taper also.
 

Tazza

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Tazza, you could always buy a taper from Enco and weld it on but it would not be near as much fun and I think you will succeed quite well with the way you are doing it. If you see drills with the right taper at sales cheap they can be sawed off right below the taper also.
I think i will just have to keep trying.
The main problem is it must be perfectly true. It will be holding a milling cutter so the taper must be exactly in-line with the hole at the end for the milling cutter. If it wasn't so important i could simply buy a few arbors and machine them down. They are quite cheap.
 
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