I need a trailer?

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Mr Jimi

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Jan 30, 2006
Messages
103
I am wanting a 12K trailer? I have searched this good?? LOL And I have a 26,000 pound license and its a beitch in the wallet LOL, I will find out this week on Florida laws and keep all of you posted. My tow vehicle weighs 6,500 pounds, does that mean I can pull 19,500 pounds? Or is that in truck? Come on with the good replies
Jim
 

sterlclan

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May 1, 2004
Messages
528
Federal law says 26001 and over needs cdl any combination adding to more than 26000 needs a cdl and it goes by registered weight of the combination I belive that the weight laws are set by the us govt not the states Jeff
 

M700man

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Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
42
Federal law says 26001 and over needs cdl any combination adding to more than 26000 needs a cdl and it goes by registered weight of the combination I belive that the weight laws are set by the us govt not the states Jeff
The 26,001 threshold is not absolute. It also depends on the trailer, if it is plated for more than 10,000#'s, or if it is deemed by the officer that it is capable of carrying more than that, even though it is shopbuilt/homemade, it will require a CDL in most states. Also, if the truck has air brakes, and some do, even though they are under the 26,001#rating, still require CDL's. This whole thing is complicated even further by the fact that most all vehicles fall under DOT regs irregardless of their size. Fed Mtr. regs, which is a different set of rules, can also come into play. Commerce, interstate, intrastate, etc. This can get very complicated very fast. And, it's further compounded by the fact that different states have different regs. Hang on, theres more. The "kind officer" who stops you has HIS version of interpretation of the regs and it usually doesn't match your version or even the next officer. Now, don't forget that some states DOT has offered training courses to local police, deputies, state patrol, etc. in inspecting trucks and trailers. This allows the DOT to increase their numbers without increasing payroll. Most of those guys don't know a kingpin from a bowling pin, but they can make your life a miserable hell, in time, aggravation and monetary expense. All of this and the threat of impounding your truck/trailer and yes they can, or, put the old sticker on it and place it "out of service". Now there's some good news!. Be prepared, as you continue your research, to ask 50 people and get 50 DIFFERENT answers. About all you can do is, maintain your truck and trailer in proper condition, use certified chain, hooks and binders. Forget the Chinese stuff. Past that, it's just a roll of the dice. Thanks, John
 

Blaine

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Joined
Nov 22, 2005
Messages
27
The 26,001 threshold is not absolute. It also depends on the trailer, if it is plated for more than 10,000#'s, or if it is deemed by the officer that it is capable of carrying more than that, even though it is shopbuilt/homemade, it will require a CDL in most states. Also, if the truck has air brakes, and some do, even though they are under the 26,001#rating, still require CDL's. This whole thing is complicated even further by the fact that most all vehicles fall under DOT regs irregardless of their size. Fed Mtr. regs, which is a different set of rules, can also come into play. Commerce, interstate, intrastate, etc. This can get very complicated very fast. And, it's further compounded by the fact that different states have different regs. Hang on, theres more. The "kind officer" who stops you has HIS version of interpretation of the regs and it usually doesn't match your version or even the next officer. Now, don't forget that some states DOT has offered training courses to local police, deputies, state patrol, etc. in inspecting trucks and trailers. This allows the DOT to increase their numbers without increasing payroll. Most of those guys don't know a kingpin from a bowling pin, but they can make your life a miserable hell, in time, aggravation and monetary expense. All of this and the threat of impounding your truck/trailer and yes they can, or, put the old sticker on it and place it "out of service". Now there's some good news!. Be prepared, as you continue your research, to ask 50 people and get 50 DIFFERENT answers. About all you can do is, maintain your truck and trailer in proper condition, use certified chain, hooks and binders. Forget the Chinese stuff. Past that, it's just a roll of the dice. Thanks, John
I am with John on this one. Some officers out there just interpret things their way and there is not a whole lot you can do about it without hiring a lawyer and going to court. The thing that has helped me the most is to make the load look proper. By this I mean that everything is strapped/chained appropriately and I will usually run additional straps/chains. All lights should be working and have their lenses. Tags should be easily seen. etc etc. The better everything appears, the lower the chance that someone will harass you.
 

M700man

Active member
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
42
I am with John on this one. Some officers out there just interpret things their way and there is not a whole lot you can do about it without hiring a lawyer and going to court. The thing that has helped me the most is to make the load look proper. By this I mean that everything is strapped/chained appropriately and I will usually run additional straps/chains. All lights should be working and have their lenses. Tags should be easily seen. etc etc. The better everything appears, the lower the chance that someone will harass you.
Blaine is right on here. That first initial "snapshot" is what usually starts or stops the ball rolling. Extra chains, straps, etc. can really help keep them at bay. Also, no loose flopping pieces. I carry several lengths of suspended ceiling wire with me for just such things. I will have to say that I have a homemade trailer that I built about 8 years ago for Bobcats and it works quite well. BUT, I feel forced to upgrade to a factory built trailer, to help keep the long arm of the law off of me. 99% of my travel is local, but I'm seeing these boys more and more in places they use to never be. My trailer has tandem MH axles, which have been outlawed in GA, but it can be used under the "Grandfather" clause. Still don't keep the heat off of you. Need that factory plate. It will only get worse from here on. Towing and transport companies are really taking a lot of heat in accidents. Lawyers have learned big words such as "HiTensile", WLL, heat treated, etc. in regards to chains, hooks, binders, etc. Anytime a truck is involved in a accident, Ken Nugent and others of his ilk, are smart enough to hire someone who knows what they don't about trucks, trailers, rigging, etc. It's a new world, boys. Thanks, John P.S. To Blaine- Thanks for your help on the parts machine. Enjoyed meeting you. Will be calling you soon on the metal roofing. Thanks, John.
 

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
Blaine is right on here. That first initial "snapshot" is what usually starts or stops the ball rolling. Extra chains, straps, etc. can really help keep them at bay. Also, no loose flopping pieces. I carry several lengths of suspended ceiling wire with me for just such things. I will have to say that I have a homemade trailer that I built about 8 years ago for Bobcats and it works quite well. BUT, I feel forced to upgrade to a factory built trailer, to help keep the long arm of the law off of me. 99% of my travel is local, but I'm seeing these boys more and more in places they use to never be. My trailer has tandem MH axles, which have been outlawed in GA, but it can be used under the "Grandfather" clause. Still don't keep the heat off of you. Need that factory plate. It will only get worse from here on. Towing and transport companies are really taking a lot of heat in accidents. Lawyers have learned big words such as "HiTensile", WLL, heat treated, etc. in regards to chains, hooks, binders, etc. Anytime a truck is involved in a accident, Ken Nugent and others of his ilk, are smart enough to hire someone who knows what they don't about trucks, trailers, rigging, etc. It's a new world, boys. Thanks, John P.S. To Blaine- Thanks for your help on the parts machine. Enjoyed meeting you. Will be calling you soon on the metal roofing. Thanks, John.
M700 By MH axels do you means mobile home? If so those can be swithched to 6 stud 5200 or 6K hubs by changing one of the bearings, seal and outer ( If memory serves) bearing are the same. Regards Ken
 

M700man

Active member
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
42
M700 By MH axels do you means mobile home? If so those can be swithched to 6 stud 5200 or 6K hubs by changing one of the bearings, seal and outer ( If memory serves) bearing are the same. Regards Ken
Ken, You are correct on both counts. I had checked on the hub conversion several years ago, but the cost was within about $80 of a new axle, if I remember correctly. However, the problem of being homemade still remains. While they can overrate the capacity on a homemade, they can also claim that it is underrated. That manufacturers plate solves a lot of problems. And, I guess when you think about it, we've all seen some homemade trailers that were certaintly not road worthy, due, not only to maintenance issues, but design, as well. Curiously enough, while the MH axles have been outlawed by GA, mobile homes continue to roll out of the factory with the same axles. And I can assure you, with the weight of the new MH's, those axles are loaded to capacity. House weights per section are exceeding 30,000#'s, and have been, for a number of years, hence the 4 and even 5 axles under them. However, this whole thing was spurred by the MH manufacturers reducing costs by not having to purchase new axles due to guys like us putting them under our trailers and thereby taking them out of circulation. Although the reason touted is that they are unsafe and prone to failure. Politics. Thanks, John
 

Mr Jimi

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2006
Messages
103
Ken, You are correct on both counts. I had checked on the hub conversion several years ago, but the cost was within about $80 of a new axle, if I remember correctly. However, the problem of being homemade still remains. While they can overrate the capacity on a homemade, they can also claim that it is underrated. That manufacturers plate solves a lot of problems. And, I guess when you think about it, we've all seen some homemade trailers that were certaintly not road worthy, due, not only to maintenance issues, but design, as well. Curiously enough, while the MH axles have been outlawed by GA, mobile homes continue to roll out of the factory with the same axles. And I can assure you, with the weight of the new MH's, those axles are loaded to capacity. House weights per section are exceeding 30,000#'s, and have been, for a number of years, hence the 4 and even 5 axles under them. However, this whole thing was spurred by the MH manufacturers reducing costs by not having to purchase new axles due to guys like us putting them under our trailers and thereby taking them out of circulation. Although the reason touted is that they are unsafe and prone to failure. Politics. Thanks, John
Our laws in Florida should be close to yours?
It states like it says on the tire ( not for highway use ) so how do they haul house trailers down the road? Is this law just for us?
If you change these tires to real trailer tires, you should be fine, I think the axles are same?
Jim
 

M700man

Active member
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
42
Our laws in Florida should be close to yours?
It states like it says on the tire ( not for highway use ) so how do they haul house trailers down the road? Is this law just for us?
If you change these tires to real trailer tires, you should be fine, I think the axles are same?
Jim
Jim, I'll run it down for you. It's NOT the tires, it is the style of wheel/axle. Open center rim. Lose a lug bolt or two, fail to torque them evenly/properly and you have a runaway missile. I've seen those things come off and rip a PATH out the back end of a mobile home. Yes, the law is just for US. Here's the deal. When mobile homes first became popular, the axles were left under the house when it was delivered. Sometime in the early 80's, the cost of new axles started to rise. The axle refurbisher was born. They would go around to all of the mobile home sales lots(still do) and pay a small sum for axles and wheels. Upon arrival at their facilities, they cleaned,greased and replaced needed parts, inspected wheels and tires. They then sold them back to the MH manufacturers to be used again. They had low miles on them so this was a viable solution. However, folks like myself and others still bought them to build trailers out of. Equipment trailer manufacturers didn't like this either as it put too many people in the business of building trailers without having to have a wholesale connection for axles. So, only one thing to do - get the politicians and the DOT to outlaw them for use as equipment trailer axles. THAT is why they are illegal. Now, I can only speak for GA, but I suspect it is pretty much universal. May not be in FLA. How do they haul house trailers on them, you ask? Like I said in my previous post, they are NOT outlawed for use under MH's, just on equipment trailers. It was all done by the manufacturers so that the number of new axles they had to purchase was greatly reduced. That's the bottom line. Thanks, John
 
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