Gehl vs john deere vs bobcat

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bunt

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Joined
Nov 11, 2006
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3
Hello all,..... I am going to purchase a ctl within a few months. I have done a bit of research and am interested in gehl, john deere and bobcat. I am comparing the gehl ct60, john deere ct 322, and the bobcat t180. I have physically seen all of them, but am not that familiar with ctl's. The john deere looks nice and has good spec's but I believe they have only been out for a year or so. The gehl looks like a nice machine and the price makes it even nicer. Bobcat has obviously been around for a long time and has a good reputation. Would like to hear if anybody has any experiences with any of these and if so, what they think of the machine. Also, are attachments from different manufacturers interchangeable? Thanks!!! Larry
 

siduramaxde

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Nov 15, 2005
Messages
362
First, have you had any previous expierence with skid loaders? Gehl track machines are made by Takehuci and they are a great machine. I own a Bobcat T200 which would be slightly bigger than the T180 and I have a few hours in a TL150 (same as the gehl ct80). I have not used a JD track machine but I have used one of their wheeled machines. The JD machine I used was ok when it wasn't in the shop. I have never seen so many problems on one machine (leaks, new motor, boom sway) with less than 2000 hours. I bought my T200 used and bobcat had to put all new rollers and idlers on it b4 I bought it. Bobcat redesigned the seals in these parts and now they seem to hold up. My bobcat works great and the cab is the most comfortable of the 3. The gehl/takehuci machine I used had gobs of power (almost too much) but it gulped fuel really fast. The thing I like the most about the gehl/takehuci machine was their pilot controls. They just use 2 joysticks to control all loader functions which is effortless when compared to the JD and bobcat hand/foot controls. The cab is also huge but is pretty basic design. Basically, you'll have to demo all of them and see what you like. Dealer support is also a concern(which is why I own a bobcat). If you live close to a large bobcat dealer I would seriously consider them. I like the fact that when I go to the bobcat dealer all they deal with is bobcat machines and they seem to know them forward and backwards. My bobcat dealer also rents every attachment bobcat makes so that is nice.
Pretty much all attachments are interchangable. However, it seems bobcat is the king of attachments. They make almost anything you can think of for a skid loader.
 

skidsteer.ca

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Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
First, have you had any previous expierence with skid loaders? Gehl track machines are made by Takehuci and they are a great machine. I own a Bobcat T200 which would be slightly bigger than the T180 and I have a few hours in a TL150 (same as the gehl ct80). I have not used a JD track machine but I have used one of their wheeled machines. The JD machine I used was ok when it wasn't in the shop. I have never seen so many problems on one machine (leaks, new motor, boom sway) with less than 2000 hours. I bought my T200 used and bobcat had to put all new rollers and idlers on it b4 I bought it. Bobcat redesigned the seals in these parts and now they seem to hold up. My bobcat works great and the cab is the most comfortable of the 3. The gehl/takehuci machine I used had gobs of power (almost too much) but it gulped fuel really fast. The thing I like the most about the gehl/takehuci machine was their pilot controls. They just use 2 joysticks to control all loader functions which is effortless when compared to the JD and bobcat hand/foot controls. The cab is also huge but is pretty basic design. Basically, you'll have to demo all of them and see what you like. Dealer support is also a concern(which is why I own a bobcat). If you live close to a large bobcat dealer I would seriously consider them. I like the fact that when I go to the bobcat dealer all they deal with is bobcat machines and they seem to know them forward and backwards. My bobcat dealer also rents every attachment bobcat makes so that is nice.
Pretty much all attachments are interchangable. However, it seems bobcat is the king of attachments. They make almost anything you can think of for a skid loader.
Bobcat, while they may make the most attachments of any one manufacturer, remember that most all attachments switch back and forth between the machine manufacturers. So my recomendation would be to consider the attachments separately and pick one with features you really like.
Ken
 

bunt

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Nov 11, 2006
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Bobcat, while they may make the most attachments of any one manufacturer, remember that most all attachments switch back and forth between the machine manufacturers. So my recomendation would be to consider the attachments separately and pick one with features you really like.
Ken
Thanks for the input,.have used severals skid steer loaders, but never a compact track loader. Sure nice to hear from those with experience with them. thanks!!!!!!!
 

frank123

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Nov 17, 2006
Messages
59
Thanks for the input,.have used severals skid steer loaders, but never a compact track loader. Sure nice to hear from those with experience with them. thanks!!!!!!!
Obviously, the biggest thing to look at on a CTL is the undercarriage if you're already familiar with skid steers in general. Things I would consider are ease of service and adjustability, ease of daily cleaning, ride quality, and overall design. I have found the Bobcat design to be less user friendly and the ride quality is very poor in comparison to Deere and Tak/Gehl. The open design and split rollers and idlers on Deere and Gehl make for a smooth ride and easy cleaning. Also, the tension adjustment is faster and is horizontal in relation to the undercarriage versus at an angle on the Bobcat, so ride quality is maintained as the tracks stretch. As the front idler is pushed out is goes downward on the bobcat, pushing it below the plane of the other rollers and further ampliifying the rough ride caused by the idler riding directly on the drive lugs of the track. For power and stability, Deere has always been tops. I think the problems referred to in another post were likely from a series 1 Deere, which I have not seen personally since the 200 series 2 hit the market. In the CTL market, the Cat guys are the ones with the most issues right now. Can't keep their undercarriage together. From there, to me it comes down to dealer service beyond that. Frank
 

WebbCo

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Joined
Sep 19, 2006
Messages
177
Obviously, the biggest thing to look at on a CTL is the undercarriage if you're already familiar with skid steers in general. Things I would consider are ease of service and adjustability, ease of daily cleaning, ride quality, and overall design. I have found the Bobcat design to be less user friendly and the ride quality is very poor in comparison to Deere and Tak/Gehl. The open design and split rollers and idlers on Deere and Gehl make for a smooth ride and easy cleaning. Also, the tension adjustment is faster and is horizontal in relation to the undercarriage versus at an angle on the Bobcat, so ride quality is maintained as the tracks stretch. As the front idler is pushed out is goes downward on the bobcat, pushing it below the plane of the other rollers and further ampliifying the rough ride caused by the idler riding directly on the drive lugs of the track. For power and stability, Deere has always been tops. I think the problems referred to in another post were likely from a series 1 Deere, which I have not seen personally since the 200 series 2 hit the market. In the CTL market, the Cat guys are the ones with the most issues right now. Can't keep their undercarriage together. From there, to me it comes down to dealer service beyond that. Frank
Be aware of machines that use dual flange idlers! The dual flange has an issue with holding the dirt and debris inside the 2 flanges where the track enters, this can cause the tracks to walk off the idler and even damage the track from the inside. The Bobcat does not have this, it is single flange and does not allow build up of dirt between track and idler.
Bobcat parts manager, who sells tracks for the other brand machines as well.
 

nilestracing

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2009
Messages
8
Larry, have you made a decision?
all are great machines id go with the cheapest in my price range with the most options ie cab heat air radio quick disconnect hi flow hydros pilot controls a must also if used, with less hours best tracks biggest size for the money. Also make sure it has turbo as all with out are weak.
 

mnli

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Joined
Nov 13, 2010
Messages
3
all are great machines id go with the cheapest in my price range with the most options ie cab heat air radio quick disconnect hi flow hydros pilot controls a must also if used, with less hours best tracks biggest size for the money. Also make sure it has turbo as all with out are weak.
kubota is the way to go , rn from obcat as fast as u can,cost lots to keep them working
 
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