Do you guys run your skidloader full throttle?

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slewpumper

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Mar 18, 2007
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I know very little about skidloaders so hope this question doesn't sound to silly. I have heard that in order for the hydro on skidloaders to be working properly you should be running them full throttle. When I am just moving logs around and not working the machine should it still be at full throttle? Also, I have a 1995 873 with a duetz diesel. Is this turbo charged? Thanks all for the help.
 

Tazza

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When working i run mine at almost full throttle. You don't need full throttle when driving down hills or driving without a load on, you will hear it groan and squeal if the revs are too low when you turn. Its really a thing you learn by feel. Usually when its cold, i make it out of the “bob port“ and down the hill at low throttle just to let it warm up a bit slower, i don't know if its any better for the engine or not but i figure lower revs when the engine is cool can't hurt.
When i have to jump out the machine for any reason i always flick it back to idle and kick the park brake on.
As for turbo, open the back door and have a look see. trace the inlet or exhaust manifold back and see if it goes to a turbo or not. I thought these did have turbo, but it may just have been an option that bobcat offered.
 

mikie

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When working i run mine at almost full throttle. You don't need full throttle when driving down hills or driving without a load on, you will hear it groan and squeal if the revs are too low when you turn. Its really a thing you learn by feel. Usually when its cold, i make it out of the “bob port“ and down the hill at low throttle just to let it warm up a bit slower, i don't know if its any better for the engine or not but i figure lower revs when the engine is cool can't hurt.
When i have to jump out the machine for any reason i always flick it back to idle and kick the park brake on.
As for turbo, open the back door and have a look see. trace the inlet or exhaust manifold back and see if it goes to a turbo or not. I thought these did have turbo, but it may just have been an option that bobcat offered.
your machine specs are rated at full throttle. like they said, what ever the situatio0n calls for.
 

nailsbeats

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Feb 11, 2007
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your machine specs are rated at full throttle. like they said, what ever the situatio0n calls for.
I run mine full throttle most of the time.
Especially important to give the revs to a new motor to get the rings seated properly. High revs develops heat, heat causes expansion, expansion seals up your motor.
Hydraulics will run quicker and stronger, machine will move faster allowing you to be a lot more productive per hour of use. In my opinion it is worse to lug a diesel engine than to run it at higher rpm's.
Down side to all of this is fuel consumption and noise levels. Endless situational opinions on this topic.
Bottom line: If you are going to work all the hydraulics, work all of the motor.
 

slewpumper

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I run mine full throttle most of the time.
Especially important to give the revs to a new motor to get the rings seated properly. High revs develops heat, heat causes expansion, expansion seals up your motor.
Hydraulics will run quicker and stronger, machine will move faster allowing you to be a lot more productive per hour of use. In my opinion it is worse to lug a diesel engine than to run it at higher rpm's.
Down side to all of this is fuel consumption and noise levels. Endless situational opinions on this topic.
Bottom line: If you are going to work all the hydraulics, work all of the motor.
Thanks guys... I found the turbo, had to take the access panel off the side to see it.
 

Tazza

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Thanks guys... I found the turbo, had to take the access panel off the side to see it.
If its a turbo machine, make sure after you give it a run that you let it sit idling for 3-5 mins before shutting it down. You need to cool the turbo down with running at idle or you can destroy your seals or bearings. You don't need the expense of a new turbo on your hands!!!
 

slewpumper

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If its a turbo machine, make sure after you give it a run that you let it sit idling for 3-5 mins before shutting it down. You need to cool the turbo down with running at idle or you can destroy your seals or bearings. You don't need the expense of a new turbo on your hands!!!
Thanks Tazza!
 

siduramaxde

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Nov 15, 2005
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Thanks Tazza!
I run mine wide open all the time. If it's not wide open the controls don't react fast enough and the machine seems lathargic. I also have a turbo machine (actually have had 2 of em and a diesel truck that starts and stops about 10-15 times a day) and I never let the turbo “cool” down. I'm not saying it's a bad idea...I just don't have time for stuff like that. I have never had turbo problems. Maybe I should knock on wood???
 

Eric

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Jan 19, 2005
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I run mine wide open all the time. If it's not wide open the controls don't react fast enough and the machine seems lathargic. I also have a turbo machine (actually have had 2 of em and a diesel truck that starts and stops about 10-15 times a day) and I never let the turbo “cool” down. I'm not saying it's a bad idea...I just don't have time for stuff like that. I have never had turbo problems. Maybe I should knock on wood???
I run mine 3/4 throttle but if the engine is straining to keep up with what Im doing (digging in for a large scoop of dirt or pushing a tree over, etc.) I will run it full throttle until Im done with that demanding task.
 

Jack

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I run mine 3/4 throttle but if the engine is straining to keep up with what Im doing (digging in for a large scoop of dirt or pushing a tree over, etc.) I will run it full throttle until Im done with that demanding task.
I have been running my S185 at 1900rpm (will do 3000). I have 20 hours up so far. My local sales rep did a PR call on me today and I asked him the question. He said, run it according to your job. IF I am using pallet forks etc, I run about 1300rpm, using the Auger, about 16-1800, 4 in 1 bucket, digging, truck loading etc 1900 or so. Clearing scrub and vegetation about 2200rpm. I have not yet need full power, but I suspect the Dozer Blade will need close to maximum rpm for heavy work.
 

A.G.

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Yes, when I need full hyd responce. For example, when using a grapple to demo, and I want explosive, destuctive force, quick tool/loader positioning, a fast dump or open tool when I reach the debris box. Also, my auger works best at full throttle more hyd flow is my guess. I traded my backhoe attachment (709) but it worked just fine practically idling along. Otherwise, it cruises around on 1/2 to 3/4 throttle. If I am around people working on the ground, I always throttle way down. Many of them don't realize that the loaders are hydrostatic and associate a high revving tractor with speed. They are afraid of being run over, by a louder revved up machine. You can spook them into an accident, like a fall by scaring them. The whole issue of cooling down a turbo depends on exaust temperature. Not the water temp, but exaust. If you are working it real hard, at full throttle, a casual ride back to your pick up or shop will provide some time for the turbo to cool down. If you just fire it up to unload a few pallets, the turbo did not get hot enough to require anytime to cool down. But if I was working the tar out of it, I might let it idle a bit before shutting down. .02 A.G.
 

Hondaman900

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I run about half throttle and then use the foot throttle as needed.
This is a great question.
What about for a Bobcat M600 (~'68) with Wisconsin engine (700 hours on factory rebuild). I know running at low throttle will stop it from being able to turn smoothly etc., but is there any harm in running full throttle all the time?
 

Tazza

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This is a great question.
What about for a Bobcat M600 (~'68) with Wisconsin engine (700 hours on factory rebuild). I know running at low throttle will stop it from being able to turn smoothly etc., but is there any harm in running full throttle all the time?
I remember talking to a buddy of mine that repairs mowers/rider mowers. He told me that you must run all air cooled engines at almost full throttle otherwise they can over heat. When they run at lower rpm the cooling system doesn't cool as well. He said not to run it flat out then just turn it off as the heat can warp the head. Run it hard, but throttle it back for a little bit at the end before shutting it down.
As your machine runs an air cooled engine it should be run at a reasonable speed, not flat out, but i would say 3/4 or full if you are doing serious digging.
I'm sure other people with have different views.
 

charger

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Dec 28, 2006
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I remember talking to a buddy of mine that repairs mowers/rider mowers. He told me that you must run all air cooled engines at almost full throttle otherwise they can over heat. When they run at lower rpm the cooling system doesn't cool as well. He said not to run it flat out then just turn it off as the heat can warp the head. Run it hard, but throttle it back for a little bit at the end before shutting it down.
As your machine runs an air cooled engine it should be run at a reasonable speed, not flat out, but i would say 3/4 or full if you are doing serious digging.
I'm sure other people with have different views.
i run my machines at 3/4 throttle,full throttle if i really need it, makes the machine less jumpy,hydraulics just don`t jump up.
 
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