Calcium Chloride In Rear Tires?

Help Support SkidSteer Forum:

BobCat

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
124
I bought a used 763 a few months back. When I went to check the air in the rear tires I discovered they were filled with calcium chloride. One has a tube in it the other is tubeless. Is it common to do that and will the CC rust out the rim on the one that's tubeless? Any thoughts? Thanks BobCat.
 

sterlclan

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2004
Messages
528
dont know how common in skid steers full size loaders are "loaded" and yes the rim will rust ...Jeff
 

Zorack

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2007
Messages
123
dont know how common in skid steers full size loaders are "loaded" and yes the rim will rust ...Jeff
Is there really any good reason for putting Calcium Chloride in tires at all? That just sounds weird IMO
 

NHDealer

Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2007
Messages
8
Is there really any good reason for putting Calcium Chloride in tires at all? That just sounds weird IMO
counter balance weight..liquid in a skidloader tire doesnt make much sense. Your better of foam filling your tires.
 

jerry

Well-known member
Joined
May 3, 2007
Messages
2,040
I always thought foam is just used so that if you get a punture it doesn't let the tyre go flat.
are there different types of foam? I bought a 610 a few years ago and it had worn out foam filled tires. Had to use a saws all to get them off the rims. The foam in them set up almost as dense as solid rubber and filled them completely. They were heavy as heck and hard to dispose of as I had the tire pieces and the foam chunks as well, I think they weighed as much as any liquid filled tire of that size. Would have been better off throwing away rims and all and buying new.
 

Tazza

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Joined
Dec 7, 2004
Messages
16,697
are there different types of foam? I bought a 610 a few years ago and it had worn out foam filled tires. Had to use a saws all to get them off the rims. The foam in them set up almost as dense as solid rubber and filled them completely. They were heavy as heck and hard to dispose of as I had the tire pieces and the foam chunks as well, I think they weighed as much as any liquid filled tire of that size. Would have been better off throwing away rims and all and buying new.
I know a guy that used to run foam filled tyres. When they wore out he just threw them on a fire to burn the rubber and foam off (not the best way i know). He then re-painted the rims and threw new tyres on!.
I don't want to know what damage it does to the metal of the rims.
That stuff is very dense and a pain to remove!
 

BobCat

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
124
I know a guy that used to run foam filled tyres. When they wore out he just threw them on a fire to burn the rubber and foam off (not the best way i know). He then re-painted the rims and threw new tyres on!.
I don't want to know what damage it does to the metal of the rims.
That stuff is very dense and a pain to remove!
Thanks guys, I think for now I'll leaver like she is. For me extra weight in the back is a good thing. I'm always try to scoop up more than the assend will hold down. Later BobCat.
 

Idoitall

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 17, 2007
Messages
126
Thanks guys, I think for now I'll leaver like she is. For me extra weight in the back is a good thing. I'm always try to scoop up more than the assend will hold down. Later BobCat.
I'm sure you likely know this, but farm tractors have long used this technique in the rear tires to improve traction and pulling power. Some use the calcium chloride, but many, including myself, use a mixture of automotive antifreeze and water and tubes. This helps with the rust issue.

I have a small 40 hp Ford and I can tell you that there is significant traction improvement when the tires are filled, especially using a turning plow or heavy disc. I don't have a front loader, so the counter weight isn't needed.

A special adapter is used to allow the air to escape while filling the tire with water using a hose.
 
Top