Best way to get unstuck

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skippyman

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Apr 23, 2007
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Hi All, well, first day with the new skid steer (743) and I got stuck in some deep wet soft humus. I tried a few things to get myself out and what eventually worked was the following; I dug the bucket in as far out in front as possible and then tilted down as I drove forward. This barely worked as the soil was so soft that I couldn't drag too hard. What I tried first was to dig in close, and tilt out driving backwards. That, did not work. Do any of you have any tips for the next time this happens to me? Thanks
 

Tazza

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I lift my bucket up, tilt it forward and lower it into the ground in front of me, then tilt the bucket back while pulling back on the sticks. This way takes a little time and a few tries but has worked every time i have been stuck in soft dirt. Just keep a fair amount of down pressure on the bucket to grip in the ground in front of you while driving backward.
I hope that made a little sense.
 

skidsteer.ca

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Jan 20, 2006
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I lift my bucket up, tilt it forward and lower it into the ground in front of me, then tilt the bucket back while pulling back on the sticks. This way takes a little time and a few tries but has worked every time i have been stuck in soft dirt. Just keep a fair amount of down pressure on the bucket to grip in the ground in front of you while driving backward.
I hope that made a little sense.
When I know the ground is soft, I try to do most of my steering where its firmer and drive straight when crossing a soft spot so the wheels on each side of the machine are doing equal work. A sharp turn in a soft spot will bury your loader.
The only other tip I have is to invest several hundred to a few thousand in a set of over the tire tracks. which is 1/2 or 2/3 the way to the full cure, which is a 40 or $50000 track loader.
The bucket trick has always worked best in the reverse direction for me.
Regards
Ken
 

Idoitall

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Mar 17, 2007
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126
I don't have a machine yet but I have had similar experiences with a backhoe and loader.
You'll notice a lot of buckets on equipment have a “chain hook” welded on the back edge of the bucket. This can be really handy for several task, dragging large objects, etc., but especially for pulling yourself out with a chain if there is a nearby tree or other suitable source, or better yet a 4WD with a winch.
Chain yourself to a tree with the bucket rolled outward, then curl it back to you to pull forward a bit. Slow, especially if you are alone, but it will work.
 

siduramaxde

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Nov 15, 2005
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I don't have a machine yet but I have had similar experiences with a backhoe and loader.
You'll notice a lot of buckets on equipment have a “chain hook” welded on the back edge of the bucket. This can be really handy for several task, dragging large objects, etc., but especially for pulling yourself out with a chain if there is a nearby tree or other suitable source, or better yet a 4WD with a winch.
Chain yourself to a tree with the bucket rolled outward, then curl it back to you to pull forward a bit. Slow, especially if you are alone, but it will work.
Track machines are great in the soft stuff but sometime they can give a false sence of security. I was back filling a sea wall that I built and was running across the front side of the wall. I made about 4 passes and on the 5th pass I sunk like a rock. Keep in mind this is in a lake bed that had been lowered a few feet for people to build walls. The mud was to the botttom of the cab. There were no trees around and I had to have a big track hoe get me out. That last pass in front of the wall was expensive. Lesson learned: When track machines get stuck you better have a bigger piece of equipment around.
 

Tazza

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Track machines are great in the soft stuff but sometime they can give a false sence of security. I was back filling a sea wall that I built and was running across the front side of the wall. I made about 4 passes and on the 5th pass I sunk like a rock. Keep in mind this is in a lake bed that had been lowered a few feet for people to build walls. The mud was to the botttom of the cab. There were no trees around and I had to have a big track hoe get me out. That last pass in front of the wall was expensive. Lesson learned: When track machines get stuck you better have a bigger piece of equipment around.
Sorry, but the mental image on that made me laugh.
I'm glad i have never been that stuck before! I have heard of other people digging out ponds or lakes, everything goes well, then you hit a soft patch and its all over. You need a truck or large loader to drag you out.
 

lgammon

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Jan 2, 2007
Messages
29
Sorry, but the mental image on that made me laugh.
I'm glad i have never been that stuck before! I have heard of other people digging out ponds or lakes, everything goes well, then you hit a soft patch and its all over. You need a truck or large loader to drag you out.
davis bros. towing service loves to come and hook to my cat. no so much since the tracks but still have there number in the ole cell phone
 

A.G.

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Joined
Nov 4, 2004
Messages
39
Last time, I chained to my Gregory Grapple, pulled it with my F 250 in 4x4 and clawed my way out going forward. I could use the tool to keep lifting the front of the loader keeping my front end up, and inching forward, while the truck helped drag me along. Sometimes you have to recover in reverse, but the rear end is almost always lower because of the engine in the rear. At times pulling it out going foward is a better option. With our bottomless peat, pushing backwards can just shove you further down. I did not have my winch mounted on my new truck, and missed it that day. Narrow Mc Claren semi solid tires on a S185 doesn't help the floatation, but I never get flats! I did notice a difference between machines when I was driving different ones. It seemed my Father in law's Case 1040 would go anywhere even in sand, but a rented Cat would get stuck easier. I think it had to do with the total weight, and how the weight was distributed. Talking to another operator, he said a John Deere could run up hills that he couldn't going forwards. So there must be something to weight distribution, in the different designs. .02 A.G.
 

skidsteer.ca

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Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
Last time, I chained to my Gregory Grapple, pulled it with my F 250 in 4x4 and clawed my way out going forward. I could use the tool to keep lifting the front of the loader keeping my front end up, and inching forward, while the truck helped drag me along. Sometimes you have to recover in reverse, but the rear end is almost always lower because of the engine in the rear. At times pulling it out going foward is a better option. With our bottomless peat, pushing backwards can just shove you further down. I did not have my winch mounted on my new truck, and missed it that day. Narrow Mc Claren semi solid tires on a S185 doesn't help the floatation, but I never get flats! I did notice a difference between machines when I was driving different ones. It seemed my Father in law's Case 1040 would go anywhere even in sand, but a rented Cat would get stuck easier. I think it had to do with the total weight, and how the weight was distributed. Talking to another operator, he said a John Deere could run up hills that he couldn't going forwards. So there must be something to weight distribution, in the different designs. .02 A.G.
Deere and New Holland have a more of the total weight resting on the front tires when unloaded. This makes them better hill climbers but harder on tires when empty.
Bobcat has a high percentage of the total weight on its rear tires. especially the older series ending in 43 or 53 ie 543, 553,743, 751, 753, 853 and the new s130 and smaller loaders.
You need about 1/2 a bucket full to have even front/rear weight distributon on these models.
Ken
 
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