Backhoe Mounts

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JD8875

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Mar 6, 2008
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I recently acquired a Case 110 Backhoe from an old Case Skid Steer (prior to the Quick-Tach Movement). After adding a new Quick-Tack plate from ATVExpress on Ebay and rebuilding all of the boom and dipper cylinders I started looking towards the stabilization links. I know I have to have something besides the Quick-Tach to hook up the hoe and make it solid. My question is do I hook back to the fame of the machine itself or can I hook back to the boom arms themselves. Anybody know how the OEM's do it especially John Deere/New Holland as my machine is a 95 JD 8875. Thanks John
 

Tazza

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You need to mount it to the loader frame. If you only attach to the arms you will get side to side movement and put more load on your pins than you really should. If your machine is a Bobcat brand, you will have holes pre-drilled in the frame to mount the attach plates to. They should be at the front just inside where the lift arms come down to.
 

skidsteer.ca

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John
By far the simplest method I have seen (and it worked well) was a quick release top link from a farm tractor 3 point hitch.
JD and New holland has them. Im sure there are others.
All it has to do is steady the bucket cylinders. I bought a 911pro hoe that was on a big Cat skidsteer that used this and it worked perfect.
Simplest to install. Weld 2 ears on the loader frame below the door with a 1" pin through, the pin holds a sphereical ball. The link just clips over top by releaseing its spring loaded catch. no tools required. Not sure what Deere wants for these, likely @ $200 but you will save it in time and matrials.
Ken
 

triad

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John
By far the simplest method I have seen (and it worked well) was a quick release top link from a farm tractor 3 point hitch.
JD and New holland has them. Im sure there are others.
All it has to do is steady the bucket cylinders. I bought a 911pro hoe that was on a big Cat skidsteer that used this and it worked perfect.
Simplest to install. Weld 2 ears on the loader frame below the door with a 1" pin through, the pin holds a sphereical ball. The link just clips over top by releaseing its spring loaded catch. no tools required. Not sure what Deere wants for these, likely @ $200 but you will save it in time and matrials.
Ken
Definetly mount to the frame as well. I purchased the hooks ( they sold me the wrong one' but they were used and I saved half the price) for my 773 to attach to my hoe and had to cut them off and add metal before I could put the hooks in the right place. Before I did this I went thru all the movements and there is no way the arms would hold up to the stress.
 
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JD8875

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Definetly mount to the frame as well. I purchased the hooks ( they sold me the wrong one' but they were used and I saved half the price) for my 773 to attach to my hoe and had to cut them off and add metal before I could put the hooks in the right place. Before I did this I went thru all the movements and there is no way the arms would hold up to the stress.
First off thanks for the replies and help guys. Secondly once you have the hoe "locked" on the machine is their any way, or need to adjust the height while maneuvering over the worksite? I found the predrilled holes in the front of the cab to tie into the frame but wanted to resolve the above issue before I custom fab too much stuff and have to start over. Thanks John
 

Tazza

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First off thanks for the replies and help guys. Secondly once you have the hoe "locked" on the machine is their any way, or need to adjust the height while maneuvering over the worksite? I found the predrilled holes in the front of the cab to tie into the frame but wanted to resolve the above issue before I custom fab too much stuff and have to start over. Thanks John
The only way to lift it on the work site is to un-hook the attachment and lift it up. When you are where you want to be you can then lock it back in. From what i found, the ground clearance when locked in is about the same as the loaders chain case anyway. If when its on the quick attach and its just off the ground you need to change its location by lowering the QA plate to raise the attachment. You can then make the support arms to suit the new height.
I have never had a problem with ground clearance, and thats me working in the yard with very un-even ground!
 

rgillard

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May 11, 2010
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The only way to lift it on the work site is to un-hook the attachment and lift it up. When you are where you want to be you can then lock it back in. From what i found, the ground clearance when locked in is about the same as the loaders chain case anyway. If when its on the quick attach and its just off the ground you need to change its location by lowering the QA plate to raise the attachment. You can then make the support arms to suit the new height.
I have never had a problem with ground clearance, and thats me working in the yard with very un-even ground!
Do the top link mounts prevent side to side motion on the loader arms?I can see how it stops the bucket tilt cylinder from moving... Thanks, Ronan
 

Tazza

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Do the top link mounts prevent side to side motion on the loader arms?I can see how it stops the bucket tilt cylinder from moving... Thanks, Ronan
It would help with side to side flex. There is no way you can remove all of it though. your stabilizer legs on the attachment will help take some of the side load too.
 

skidsteer.ca

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It would help with side to side flex. There is no way you can remove all of it though. your stabilizer legs on the attachment will help take some of the side load too.
The 3pt setup I mentioned above had no side to side support and it did not really seem to be a issue. Though most of the other setups I have seen did support the boom from side stress. But I think Tazza is right and most of the force is directed at the tilt cylinders that needs to be steadied. The boom is pretty tough, but the tilt cylinders have poor leverage in the position they sit with a hoe on.
Ken
 
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JD8875

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The 3pt setup I mentioned above had no side to side support and it did not really seem to be a issue. Though most of the other setups I have seen did support the boom from side stress. But I think Tazza is right and most of the force is directed at the tilt cylinders that needs to be steadied. The boom is pretty tough, but the tilt cylinders have poor leverage in the position they sit with a hoe on.
Ken
My homebrew mounts don't stop side to side flex, but I don't have an issue with it. I regularly dig off sided installing culverts or digging next to buildings without any trouble. The biggest hassle is hooking and unhooking them, but they aren't that big of a hassle. John
 

jerry

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May 3, 2007
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My homebrew mounts don't stop side to side flex, but I don't have an issue with it. I regularly dig off sided installing culverts or digging next to buildings without any trouble. The biggest hassle is hooking and unhooking them, but they aren't that big of a hassle. John
John. can you put up a picture of your mount? I finally put a single trailer ball in the center of the machine and it works but am going to change that for something with more support. I have limited clearance between whatever mount I put there and the cross tube on the boom when the hoe is off and I lift the boom so I need some thing compact but strong. thanks. Jerry
 
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