Another OLD bobcat fan

Help Support SkidSteer Forum:

m610

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2006
Messages
173
My machine is an M-610 that I have had for almost 20 years and was traded for an old truck. Simple Wisconsin engine and non-hydrostatic drive. Been thinking of getting a hydrostatic diesel machine but not loaded with cash either. Use for home tasks and the occasional cleanup for anyone asking for help after hurricanes. I like the old machines a lot but since I have never even operated another machine besides the 610 or OMC series 1700 you could probably say I am just starting out? Honestly I don't really like the newer Bobcats with their longer wheelbases and fancy joysticks. I do all my own repairs and like to keep it simple. As for me I am 6'7" tall so it's probably funny to see that in the old 610. If anyone needs advice on this machine I would be happy to help.
 

M700man

Active member
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
42
Welcome, M610 ! I'm not the official greeter here (lol) but wanted to acknowledge your joining the forum. I'm not familiar with the 610"s, but given what you want to do, you really should consider the M700,720 or 721. All are hydrostatic but incredibly simple and you can do quite a bit with one if the hydros are up to snuff. Most if not all, parts, are still available from Bobcat. I currently have several 742's but that was only because they were readily available. I do not like the 742 as well as I did the M700's and I can see where it will be a lot more difficult to work on. I can only envision how difficult the new ones must be. Especially with the electronics. The only real drawback to the M7 series is the fact that the hydro oil also lubricates the chain/sprockets/etc. and you are subject to metal fines getting into your pumps. However, there is a large filter on the bottom as well as a charge filter up top. I believe with proper service intervals and high quality oil this is not a real problem as you and I do not run these machines everyday as a lot of the other guys do. After a lot of research, I determined (factually) that the best oil is Mobil DTE15M. A little pricy but well worth it. If I can be of any help on these machines, let me know. I don't claim to be an expert, but have had a certain amount of experience on them. The Wisconsin (as you already know) is virtually bulletproof and very dependable. The M700 has a lift capacity of about 1200#'s. Not too shabby. I have used them for demolition and brush clearing. With a drive pressure of 4500#'s, believe me, they move quick. Well, enough of my ramblings. Let us know what you decide to do. Thanks, John
 

Tazza

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Joined
Dec 7, 2004
Messages
16,694
Welcome, M610 ! I'm not the official greeter here (lol) but wanted to acknowledge your joining the forum. I'm not familiar with the 610"s, but given what you want to do, you really should consider the M700,720 or 721. All are hydrostatic but incredibly simple and you can do quite a bit with one if the hydros are up to snuff. Most if not all, parts, are still available from Bobcat. I currently have several 742's but that was only because they were readily available. I do not like the 742 as well as I did the M700's and I can see where it will be a lot more difficult to work on. I can only envision how difficult the new ones must be. Especially with the electronics. The only real drawback to the M7 series is the fact that the hydro oil also lubricates the chain/sprockets/etc. and you are subject to metal fines getting into your pumps. However, there is a large filter on the bottom as well as a charge filter up top. I believe with proper service intervals and high quality oil this is not a real problem as you and I do not run these machines everyday as a lot of the other guys do. After a lot of research, I determined (factually) that the best oil is Mobil DTE15M. A little pricy but well worth it. If I can be of any help on these machines, let me know. I don't claim to be an expert, but have had a certain amount of experience on them. The Wisconsin (as you already know) is virtually bulletproof and very dependable. The M700 has a lift capacity of about 1200#'s. Not too shabby. I have used them for demolition and brush clearing. With a drive pressure of 4500#'s, believe me, they move quick. Well, enough of my ramblings. Let us know what you decide to do. Thanks, John
I too own an old bobcat, i have an old 731. It was built the same year i was born, 1978 (a good vintage). This machine runs a deutz air cooled diesel engine, it is basically bullet proof, starts first go even when its cold. When i got it, the previous owner had replaced the engine, the hydrostatics are still in great condition.
This was my first bobcat, i have had so much work out of it it doesn't owe me a cent. It is very simple to work on. All the air cooled machines are a little easier as they have no radiators to worry about, but air cooled engines generally are a little more noisy. All the machines up to and including the 743 are non-electronic and are easy to work on. The later model stuff is all computer controlled. I would love a nice new machine, but all i need is for the computer to fry and i will be up for a few grand to replace it.
 

m610

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2006
Messages
173
Welcome, M610 ! I'm not the official greeter here (lol) but wanted to acknowledge your joining the forum. I'm not familiar with the 610"s, but given what you want to do, you really should consider the M700,720 or 721. All are hydrostatic but incredibly simple and you can do quite a bit with one if the hydros are up to snuff. Most if not all, parts, are still available from Bobcat. I currently have several 742's but that was only because they were readily available. I do not like the 742 as well as I did the M700's and I can see where it will be a lot more difficult to work on. I can only envision how difficult the new ones must be. Especially with the electronics. The only real drawback to the M7 series is the fact that the hydro oil also lubricates the chain/sprockets/etc. and you are subject to metal fines getting into your pumps. However, there is a large filter on the bottom as well as a charge filter up top. I believe with proper service intervals and high quality oil this is not a real problem as you and I do not run these machines everyday as a lot of the other guys do. After a lot of research, I determined (factually) that the best oil is Mobil DTE15M. A little pricy but well worth it. If I can be of any help on these machines, let me know. I don't claim to be an expert, but have had a certain amount of experience on them. The Wisconsin (as you already know) is virtually bulletproof and very dependable. The M700 has a lift capacity of about 1200#'s. Not too shabby. I have used them for demolition and brush clearing. With a drive pressure of 4500#'s, believe me, they move quick. Well, enough of my ramblings. Let us know what you decide to do. Thanks, John
I would agree with you as I have the M700 and M720 manuals and after a look through like the similarities to the M610. Almost looks like an older machine with the hydrostatics put in place of the variable belt drive! Trouble is, where can you find such old Bobcats? On the other hand I really like the way the 743 Bobcats look and I used to see them all of the time in action when I was a traffic signal tech but never got to try it out. Before I worked there they had given away two M700 Bobcats due to a hydraulic pump spewing metal throughout the system but it would have been a fun project to take the machines apart and clean everything, and at the same time paint and restore the machine. I am not limited to Bobcat either, I have looked at Case, and Thomas which appear to be good as well. Just have a long time relationship with my M610 and will keep it even if I get a new companion for it. Basically looking to give the old Bobcat a break while I have another machine for the side work, last year's hurricane season put 200+ hours on the old machine and I don't even charge for the cleanups for friends and neighbors. They supply the gas and small expenses and I help them move the debris to the street. Very rarely I do a paid job like removing trees or clearing for a driveway or patio. All in all it's a way to keep the machine running and it's interesting to see what a current Bobcat owner or user thinks abou the old machine
 

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
I would agree with you as I have the M700 and M720 manuals and after a look through like the similarities to the M610. Almost looks like an older machine with the hydrostatics put in place of the variable belt drive! Trouble is, where can you find such old Bobcats? On the other hand I really like the way the 743 Bobcats look and I used to see them all of the time in action when I was a traffic signal tech but never got to try it out. Before I worked there they had given away two M700 Bobcats due to a hydraulic pump spewing metal throughout the system but it would have been a fun project to take the machines apart and clean everything, and at the same time paint and restore the machine. I am not limited to Bobcat either, I have looked at Case, and Thomas which appear to be good as well. Just have a long time relationship with my M610 and will keep it even if I get a new companion for it. Basically looking to give the old Bobcat a break while I have another machine for the side work, last year's hurricane season put 200+ hours on the old machine and I don't even charge for the cleanups for friends and neighbors. They supply the gas and small expenses and I help them move the debris to the street. Very rarely I do a paid job like removing trees or clearing for a driveway or patio. All in all it's a way to keep the machine running and it's interesting to see what a current Bobcat owner or user thinks abou the old machine
Most of the Bobcat machines in the 98 and older vintage (pre G series) are only computer controled if they have the "Boss" guage package or "system" The idea behind the boss was to shut down the machine or warn the operator, depending upon the seriousness of the malfuction the guage sensors were reading. Low fuel level, hi air filter restriction, above normal coolant temp, low coolant level, low batt voltage, would sound an alarm. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Low engine oil press, hot coolant temp, hot hydrostatic temp, low charge oil press would cause an engine shutdown in a few seconds. Machines without the Boss had the std 2" round guages instead of the bar graph guages and had nothing fancier in the wiring then a common automotive relay for the glow plugs and engine fuel shutoff, And a hand full of magnetic sensors for the BICS (bobcat interlock control system (I think)) for machines 94 and Newer. The bics controller is on the operators right beside the seat on these machine and has 5 lights on it. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ The Boss system could be switched to the std guage package for the cost of a few guages and a day or two of wiring. The bics system should it fail could also be bypassed for minimal cost and the machine would still have the mechanical safety lock for the boom and tilt. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Interestingly, the seat cushion switch that was used in the early bics 94 to 98, had a bypass kit available from bobcat as stuff (gravel, pop can etc) would get under the seat and the loader would lock up, and so bobcat quit using a seat sensor on the G series 99 and up loader.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Imho these machines are not really computer controled and in the event that a Boss computer box, or the fancy guage panel failed the machine could be switch to a std guage package. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------My 93 753 did have the Boss and I replaced 4 or 5 sensors on the machine at 30 to $50 between 2000 and 3300 hrs. I also had the system start throwing up giberish codes @ 3100 hrs, this was traced to a bad computer, dealer gave me a used loaner to verify. Ran good for 100 hrs, Then I reused my old one that we had drilled the rivots out of its tin box, and tighten up a few "ground" screws on the printed circuit board. And it was cured.---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 93 was also the last year without BICS I'm not really a fan of the early boss system, but I would'nt be scared of it either. The G series I'm told is more reliable, but at 1800 hrs its too soon to tell. Just in case any you get around to purchasing a (becoming) old C or F series machine someday. regards Ken
 

Tazza

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Joined
Dec 7, 2004
Messages
16,694
Most of the Bobcat machines in the 98 and older vintage (pre G series) are only computer controled if they have the "Boss" guage package or "system" The idea behind the boss was to shut down the machine or warn the operator, depending upon the seriousness of the malfuction the guage sensors were reading. Low fuel level, hi air filter restriction, above normal coolant temp, low coolant level, low batt voltage, would sound an alarm. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Low engine oil press, hot coolant temp, hot hydrostatic temp, low charge oil press would cause an engine shutdown in a few seconds. Machines without the Boss had the std 2" round guages instead of the bar graph guages and had nothing fancier in the wiring then a common automotive relay for the glow plugs and engine fuel shutoff, And a hand full of magnetic sensors for the BICS (bobcat interlock control system (I think)) for machines 94 and Newer. The bics controller is on the operators right beside the seat on these machine and has 5 lights on it. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ The Boss system could be switched to the std guage package for the cost of a few guages and a day or two of wiring. The bics system should it fail could also be bypassed for minimal cost and the machine would still have the mechanical safety lock for the boom and tilt. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Interestingly, the seat cushion switch that was used in the early bics 94 to 98, had a bypass kit available from bobcat as stuff (gravel, pop can etc) would get under the seat and the loader would lock up, and so bobcat quit using a seat sensor on the G series 99 and up loader.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Imho these machines are not really computer controled and in the event that a Boss computer box, or the fancy guage panel failed the machine could be switch to a std guage package. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------My 93 753 did have the Boss and I replaced 4 or 5 sensors on the machine at 30 to $50 between 2000 and 3300 hrs. I also had the system start throwing up giberish codes @ 3100 hrs, this was traced to a bad computer, dealer gave me a used loaner to verify. Ran good for 100 hrs, Then I reused my old one that we had drilled the rivots out of its tin box, and tighten up a few "ground" screws on the printed circuit board. And it was cured.---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 93 was also the last year without BICS I'm not really a fan of the early boss system, but I would'nt be scared of it either. The G series I'm told is more reliable, but at 1800 hrs its too soon to tell. Just in case any you get around to purchasing a (becoming) old C or F series machine someday. regards Ken
Well, its not so much the computer that worries me, its the electro/hydraulic vavles. From what i gather, the later model machines use PWM to controll the amount of oil they let out by the amount you move your control. This isn't really computer controlled, but it is all electronic.
I also heard (second hand info) that the coils for the control vavles are like 800 USD each.
The fully mechanical machines are nice and simple as they have no electronics to worry about.
Don't get me wrong, i would LOVE a new machine but i like to do my own repairs.
I will be adding the equivilant to a BOSS system to my 743, they call it a “watch dog” system.
 

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
Well, its not so much the computer that worries me, its the electro/hydraulic vavles. From what i gather, the later model machines use PWM to controll the amount of oil they let out by the amount you move your control. This isn't really computer controlled, but it is all electronic.
I also heard (second hand info) that the coils for the control vavles are like 800 USD each.
The fully mechanical machines are nice and simple as they have no electronics to worry about.
Don't get me wrong, i would LOVE a new machine but i like to do my own repairs.
I will be adding the equivilant to a BOSS system to my 743, they call it a “watch dog” system.
With the G series and up if they have "Advanced hand controls" or the all wheel steer machines, you get into some pretty "fancy" stuff, us "Average Joe" won't have the tools to fix. And yes if you want the protection of the "Boss" without the expense, Murphy Switchguage http://www.fwmurphy.com out of Tulsa, Ok. make simular to "watchdog protection sytems" for $ 200 to $300. There are thousands of engines in service with no operator near by (think generators etc) and they make shutdowns and alarms for these that can be maintained and serviced with basic tools. I had considered, Advanced hand contols for my 773g, (my dad dislikes the foot pedals) but a local tech talk me out of it, just because if they malfunction you need Bobcat test equipment to find the trouble, And parts are not going to be cheap. Also I had used a 873 with the AHC and it was ok, but after learn foot pedals, I really prefered them over the hand controls, unless you were really trying to do fine loader movements. I found with the AHC, when looking out the back window, I'd be moving the loader up because the controls where so "low effort" However I only used the machine for 25 hours, and I think I flipped the switch back to foot controls after a couple hours. So far the Boss on my 773g has been trouble free and my tech tells me they are better then the C and F series Boss, I hope he is right. It good to shutdown the engine if you need to, but it sucks when you are "brokedown" just because of the protection system. Regards Ken
 

M700man

Active member
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
42
With the G series and up if they have "Advanced hand controls" or the all wheel steer machines, you get into some pretty "fancy" stuff, us "Average Joe" won't have the tools to fix. And yes if you want the protection of the "Boss" without the expense, Murphy Switchguage http://www.fwmurphy.com out of Tulsa, Ok. make simular to "watchdog protection sytems" for $ 200 to $300. There are thousands of engines in service with no operator near by (think generators etc) and they make shutdowns and alarms for these that can be maintained and serviced with basic tools. I had considered, Advanced hand contols for my 773g, (my dad dislikes the foot pedals) but a local tech talk me out of it, just because if they malfunction you need Bobcat test equipment to find the trouble, And parts are not going to be cheap. Also I had used a 873 with the AHC and it was ok, but after learn foot pedals, I really prefered them over the hand controls, unless you were really trying to do fine loader movements. I found with the AHC, when looking out the back window, I'd be moving the loader up because the controls where so "low effort" However I only used the machine for 25 hours, and I think I flipped the switch back to foot controls after a couple hours. So far the Boss on my 773g has been trouble free and my tech tells me they are better then the C and F series Boss, I hope he is right. It good to shutdown the engine if you need to, but it sucks when you are "brokedown" just because of the protection system. Regards Ken
Ken, I understand what you are saying about the newer machines. I suppose we have to divide ourselves into two groups. Professional users and do-it-yourselfers. Personally, I don't have a lot of patience with some young engineer's brainstorm. We all have had great ideas, but most of them have not worked out too well. Of course, I haven't been able to sell my mistakes, just pay for them. Sure, some of them have worked, but a lot of the "improvements" are just plain nonsense. Of course, most of it is to box you in to going back to the dealer for service. Same way on the vehicles. Yes, a lot of the computer controls are great - when they work. But when they don't, they are expensive and time consuming to repair. I suppose I relish self-sufficiency too much. I have heard too many stories (a lot of them from Bobcat mechanics/shop foremans) about the problems with the electronics/computer control, etc. As to the AHC, I remember seeing a program on the Discovery channel on machines. One of the segments was on a John Deere combine (38' grain head, I believe) - huge machine. The owner said that he could put a 40-50 year old in the cab and he would have a hard time learning how to run it because ALL of the functions were controlled by the two joysticks. However, he could put a 18 year old in the seat and he would be running it like a professional in a matter of minutes. Why ? Because when John Deere designed the control system, they patterned it after the video games that these kids started playing when they were young. It's their world - they have grown up in it. Just not built for us old timers, because most of us won't be around much longer to run the new machines anyway. I now know how the blacksmith felt when he looked up and saw the first Model T coming down the road. When it comes to this new technology, most of it is not truly dependable. Thanks, John
 

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
Ken, I understand what you are saying about the newer machines. I suppose we have to divide ourselves into two groups. Professional users and do-it-yourselfers. Personally, I don't have a lot of patience with some young engineer's brainstorm. We all have had great ideas, but most of them have not worked out too well. Of course, I haven't been able to sell my mistakes, just pay for them. Sure, some of them have worked, but a lot of the "improvements" are just plain nonsense. Of course, most of it is to box you in to going back to the dealer for service. Same way on the vehicles. Yes, a lot of the computer controls are great - when they work. But when they don't, they are expensive and time consuming to repair. I suppose I relish self-sufficiency too much. I have heard too many stories (a lot of them from Bobcat mechanics/shop foremans) about the problems with the electronics/computer control, etc. As to the AHC, I remember seeing a program on the Discovery channel on machines. One of the segments was on a John Deere combine (38' grain head, I believe) - huge machine. The owner said that he could put a 40-50 year old in the cab and he would have a hard time learning how to run it because ALL of the functions were controlled by the two joysticks. However, he could put a 18 year old in the seat and he would be running it like a professional in a matter of minutes. Why ? Because when John Deere designed the control system, they patterned it after the video games that these kids started playing when they were young. It's their world - they have grown up in it. Just not built for us old timers, because most of us won't be around much longer to run the new machines anyway. I now know how the blacksmith felt when he looked up and saw the first Model T coming down the road. When it comes to this new technology, most of it is not truly dependable. Thanks, John
You can't go wrong with mechaincal valves, fuel injection, old school tech if you are a lower hour user, Leave that hi teck spendy stuff for the boys who make big bucks and trade up to new machines often. Though I wonder how the value of their old machines will hold up. Regards Ken
 

Tigerotor77W

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2004
Messages
268
Ken, I understand what you are saying about the newer machines. I suppose we have to divide ourselves into two groups. Professional users and do-it-yourselfers. Personally, I don't have a lot of patience with some young engineer's brainstorm. We all have had great ideas, but most of them have not worked out too well. Of course, I haven't been able to sell my mistakes, just pay for them. Sure, some of them have worked, but a lot of the "improvements" are just plain nonsense. Of course, most of it is to box you in to going back to the dealer for service. Same way on the vehicles. Yes, a lot of the computer controls are great - when they work. But when they don't, they are expensive and time consuming to repair. I suppose I relish self-sufficiency too much. I have heard too many stories (a lot of them from Bobcat mechanics/shop foremans) about the problems with the electronics/computer control, etc. As to the AHC, I remember seeing a program on the Discovery channel on machines. One of the segments was on a John Deere combine (38' grain head, I believe) - huge machine. The owner said that he could put a 40-50 year old in the cab and he would have a hard time learning how to run it because ALL of the functions were controlled by the two joysticks. However, he could put a 18 year old in the seat and he would be running it like a professional in a matter of minutes. Why ? Because when John Deere designed the control system, they patterned it after the video games that these kids started playing when they were young. It's their world - they have grown up in it. Just not built for us old timers, because most of us won't be around much longer to run the new machines anyway. I now know how the blacksmith felt when he looked up and saw the first Model T coming down the road. When it comes to this new technology, most of it is not truly dependable. Thanks, John
I wanted to reply to this message briefly... many of the people designing the products aren't all young engineers. Much of the design isn't always governed by the laws of engineering or engineering principle; it's based on cost.

And due to that alone, my bet is that more companies will begin to migrate toward EH controls. I know it's a shame to some, but hopefully they will be developed enough that not too many users will up and quit the industry.
 

M700man

Active member
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
42
I wanted to reply to this message briefly... many of the people designing the products aren't all young engineers. Much of the design isn't always governed by the laws of engineering or engineering principle; it's based on cost.

And due to that alone, my bet is that more companies will begin to migrate toward EH controls. I know it's a shame to some, but hopefully they will be developed enough that not too many users will up and quit the industry.
I spppose, if this keeps going, we should start a new thread ! My sole intent, in making my posts, are not to attack or incite, but rather analyze why and how. No offense taken and none intended. Anyhow, Tigerotor, you brought up an important point, which I left out. Yes, a lot of these "new and improved" "better ideas" are based on cost. Couldn't agree more. As to EH controls, of course that is the wave of the future, as I pointed out in my previous post, the machines are designed for the younger generations. They have to be. In fact, everything is, if you think about it. The young people represent the largest percentage of buyers/users of all products. Just as the Chevelle's, GTO's, Barracuda's, etc. were designed with us teenagers in mind ! It's just the way things have to work. Thanks guys, John
 

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
I spppose, if this keeps going, we should start a new thread ! My sole intent, in making my posts, are not to attack or incite, but rather analyze why and how. No offense taken and none intended. Anyhow, Tigerotor, you brought up an important point, which I left out. Yes, a lot of these "new and improved" "better ideas" are based on cost. Couldn't agree more. As to EH controls, of course that is the wave of the future, as I pointed out in my previous post, the machines are designed for the younger generations. They have to be. In fact, everything is, if you think about it. The young people represent the largest percentage of buyers/users of all products. Just as the Chevelle's, GTO's, Barracuda's, etc. were designed with us teenagers in mind ! It's just the way things have to work. Thanks guys, John
No offence taken, just wanted to point out the 90's erra machines are not overly "techie" All are welcome here. Ps I drive a 71 mach 1, I was 3 when it was built. Not sure what to do about these posts, topics tend to evolve. let the Mods straighten us out I guess. Good day All Ken
 
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
9
No offence taken, just wanted to point out the 90's erra machines are not overly "techie" All are welcome here. Ps I drive a 71 mach 1, I was 3 when it was built. Not sure what to do about these posts, topics tend to evolve. let the Mods straighten us out I guess. Good day All Ken
Hmm well I got a 600-m (1971) and a my grandfather has a 600 foundry special (1969). So I would have to say I got the oldest machines on this site then. Almost got it back together. Just have to get the rebuilt motor back in it. Then its good to go again for another 35 years. There are pics of me in this machine when I was 2 years old. Its no show room restore, but enough so we can still use it with out any problems.
 

Dwan

Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2006
Messages
8
Hmm well I got a 600-m (1971) and a my grandfather has a 600 foundry special (1969). So I would have to say I got the oldest machines on this site then. Almost got it back together. Just have to get the rebuilt motor back in it. Then its good to go again for another 35 years. There are pics of me in this machine when I was 2 years old. Its no show room restore, but enough so we can still use it with out any problems.
1978 975, 1979 075, and a 1979 974 here. Got to love the older machines. I have had the 1979 975 sence 1982 and it has paid for itself every year over and over again. only repairs needed was a new motor (JD) when a frend stood it on it's nose got out and left the motor running. There is over 8000 hours on it and still runs great. The 974 was bought for parts but turned out to be in repairable condition so it was restored back in 86. Typical perkins smokes when it is cold but other then the low power from the pirkins it is a good machine. Bought the last 975 2 years ago because I found it on e-bay for $3500 and it was in fair shape. again I was looking for a parts machine but ended up restoring it. I would post a few pictures if Icould. Dwan
 

skidsteer.ca

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
3,853
1978 975, 1979 075, and a 1979 974 here. Got to love the older machines. I have had the 1979 975 sence 1982 and it has paid for itself every year over and over again. only repairs needed was a new motor (JD) when a frend stood it on it's nose got out and left the motor running. There is over 8000 hours on it and still runs great. The 974 was bought for parts but turned out to be in repairable condition so it was restored back in 86. Typical perkins smokes when it is cold but other then the low power from the pirkins it is a good machine. Bought the last 975 2 years ago because I found it on e-bay for $3500 and it was in fair shape. again I was looking for a parts machine but ended up restoring it. I would post a few pictures if Icould. Dwan
Dwan
You will have to read Erics post on how to post pictures.
You need to go into your profile and put a check mark beside “use html editor”.
This also make it possible to to makes paragraphs in your posts, nicer to read.
After y ou change your profile go to the “Media” tab at the top of the page and create a “album” and the browse and upload you photos into it.
we can't wait :)
Regards
Ken
 

Eric

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
Messages
169
Dwan
You will have to read Erics post on how to post pictures.
You need to go into your profile and put a check mark beside “use html editor”.
This also make it possible to to makes paragraphs in your posts, nicer to read.
After y ou change your profile go to the “Media” tab at the top of the page and create a “album” and the browse and upload you photos into it.
we can't wait :)
Regards
Ken
Dwan
If you dont have time to figure out how to post images, just email them to me and I will set it up. I want to see some photos as well. [email protected]
 

M700man

Active member
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
42
John -- no offense taken here, either. I didn't mean to come across as being offended in my original reply -- sorry 'bout that!

Have a good one.
Tigerotor - no problem here either ! Would have replied sooner to your post, but I've really been busy for the last 1 1/2 months. That's the problem with these computers, it's really hard sometimes to be certain one comes across in the right way. Easy to be misunderstood. But, I think we're all on good terms here !! Take care. John
 
Top